Εργαλεία
  1. 20-Something Who Thought COVID Was 'Bull****' Pleads From ICU to Wear Masks "I paid the price... Now I'm in intensive care, waiting to get more treatment, and not knowing if I'm coming out the other side," the man said. "So I really want you to take this message on board because it could happen to anyone."
    newsweek.com
  2. The Trump administration is challenging a court ruling that prevents it from ending the census early US Census workers stand outside Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts on September 24, 2020 in New York City. | Noam Galai/Getty Images With just days to go, the Trump administration wants to end the census on September 30. The current deadline to respond to the 2020 census is October 31 — but that could change depending on the outcome of a lawsuit that the Trump administration is currently fighting in federal court. Earlier this week, a federal judge in California temporarily blocked the Trump administration from ending counting efforts on September 30, a month earlier than the administration has previously sought, because doing so would likely hurt the accuracy of the count. Instead, US District Judge Lucy Koh extended the deadline until October 31 in order to give the Census Bureau more time to collect responses online, by mail, and by door knocking in undercounted areas. But on Friday night, the Trump administration asked the Ninth Circuit to immediately suspend Koh’s ruling, arguing that the September 30 deadline must stand in order for it to be able to deliver final population counts to Congress by December 31 as it is required to do by federal law. Those population counts will be used to determine how many representatives each state will receive in Congress — and to redraw congressional districts — in 2021. Koh had waiving that December 31 deadline, as well, suggesting that census results could be delivered to Congress by a later date. But the Trump administration told the Ninth Circuit on Friday that she didn’t have the authority to do so. If the administration’s appeal succeeds, a shortened census could lead to inaccuracies and undercounts among historically hard-to-count populations — including communities of color, immigrants, and those living in rural areas, Census Bureau officials and former directors have warned. It’s just the latest complication in what has been the most chaotic and politically charged census in recent history. The Census Bureau had to suspend its operations for two months at the outset of the coronavirus pandemic, resuming counting efforts in June and scrambling to make up for lost time. Ongoing wildfires on the West Coast and a historic hurricane season in the South have also created hurdles to completing the count in affected areas. And President Donald Trump has sought to exclude unauthorized immigrants from census population counts that will be used for redistricting, which could have the affect of depressing response rates in immigrant communities and undermine their political power. Why cutting short counting efforts could hurt the census’s accuracy The stakes of the census are high: Not only does it dictate representation in Congress and redistricting, but it also determines federal funding levels for health care, food stamps, highways and transportation, education, public housing, as well as unemployment insurance and public safety — among other programs. An undercount could reduce communities’ resources and political power for the next decade. Trump administration officials knew the cutting short census operations could lead to inaccuracies in the count and what that could mean for historically hard-to-count populations. Internal Census Bureau communications released in court filings show career civil servants warned that a shortened counting period would “result in a census that has fatal data quality flaws that are unacceptable for a Constitutionally-mandated national activity.” But the administration decided to move forward with their plan anyway. Current response rates suggest census takers do, in fact, need more time for collection. As of September 25, the current nationwide self-response rate is 66.3 percent, slightly below the 2010 rate of 66.5 percent and 2000 rate of 67.4 percent. But at the local level, response rates can vary widely. For instance, in parts of Texas along the Mexico border, the self-response rate is still 15 percent or lower. In order to capture households that have failed to self-report, census workers haveto rely on alternate strategies for counting people, such ason reports from their neighbors, which are not always accurate. The bureau can also attempt to use administrative records, including Social Security and IRS data, to fill in the gaps in responses. That could be a problem — hard-to-count households are precisely the kind of households for which the federal government lacks reliable administrative records. For instance, unauthorized immigrants do not have Social Security numbers and may rely on a cash economy without filing taxes with the IRS (though many of them do file taxes). A reliance on methods like these could also lead to housing units being categorized as vacant when there are people living there, particularly if a census taker cannot reach them due to factors like natural disasters, and does not have the opportunity — or the time — to follow up. All of this can lead to inaccuracies and undercounts that will strip communities of the political representation and the federal dollars they deserve.
    vox.com
  3. Cream of Wheat to remove Black chef mascot from the box as it updates imagery in wake of calls for racial equality The smiling Black chef will soon come off the boxes of Cream of Wheat. The news comes after Mars Inc said Uncle Ben's will be renamed Ben's Original.       
    usatoday.com
  4. Trump May Win Electoral College, Lose Popular Vote Again, 2016 Poll Comparison Shows Biden's seemingly clear path to victory may be a result of skewed polls, 2016 comparisons show, with Trump still set up to lose the popular vote—but potentially win the Electoral College once again.
    newsweek.com
  5. I feel bad for Jets fans Dear Jets fans, I know the past few months have sucked for you. (Yes, the better part of the past 50 years have stunk, I get it.) But the past few months have really stunk. Your team has played two games and been noncompetitive in both. Now the Jets play at defensively stingy Indianapolis on...
    nypost.com
  6. Officer flagged "dangerous condition" before 1963 sub disaster Year after USS Thresher was lost in 1963, CBS News' Dan Rather reported: "All the events of that morning may never be known."
    cbsnews.com
  7. nypost.com
  8. Minneapolis bishop hosting gun buyback as homicide toll climbs Minneapolis Bishop Richard Howell Jr. is leading a gun buyback program in an effort to reduce crime.
    foxnews.com
  9. Parks Department workers are closing NYC parks early — with visitors still inside Parks Department workers are slamming shut the cast-iron gates of one Manhattan green space ahead of closing time, even with visitors inside.
    nypost.com
  10. LSU vs Mississippi State: How to Watch on TV and Online, Betting Lines and Odds After going 15-0 last season, the Tigers begin their title defense with a vastly different-looking team.
    newsweek.com
  11. American hero steps up when passenger has meltdown on Korean Air flight The Korean Air flight attendants might have been small, but they were mighty in bringing down a violent passenger — with a little help from a 6-foot-tall American. On the final leg of a Seoul-to-Seattle jaunt, a man in business class put a clear plastic bag over his head, pulled out a sharp hairpin and...
    nypost.com
  12. Former Trump Aides Are Being Sought to Speak Out About 'Dangerous Moment' Ahead of Election Former officials have a "moral duty" to voice their concerns about his presidency, said Miles Taylor, the former chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security.
    newsweek.com
  13. Nationals, manager Martinez agree to multiyear extension Manager Dave Martinez and the Washington Nationals agreed to a multiyear contract extension that the team announced Saturday.
    foxnews.com
  14. Conor McGregor vs. Manny Pacquiao odds: WBA champ opens as heavy favorite Friday, Conor McGregor tweeted he's fighting Manny Pacquiao – and the opening betting odds have already been released.        Related StoriesConor McGregor vs. Manny Pacquiao odds: WBA champ opens as heavy favorite - Enclosure'EA UFC 4' adds Calvin Kattar, Pedro Munhoz as playable characters'EA UFC 4' adds Calvin Kattar, Pedro Munhoz as playable characters - Enclosure 
    usatoday.com
  15. Ukraine grounds model of military transport plane after crash Ukraine’s president is halting all flights of a transport plane after one crashed and left all but one of the 27 military members on board dead. The twin-turboprop Antonov-26 went down Friday night while approaching a runway in Chuhuiv, about 250 miles east of the capital Kyiv, the Associated Press reported. On board were 20...
    nypost.com
  16. Trump and Biden to face off in first 2020 presidential debate President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden will be going head-to-head in their first presidential debate Tuesday night in Cleveland, Ohio. Ed O'Keefe breaks down the likely topics, including the Supreme Court and a peaceful transition of power, and what the election battlefield looks like ahead of their first formal meet-up as candidates.
    cbsnews.com
  17. Marlins clinch 1st playoff berth since 2003, beat Yanks 4-3 Forced from the field by COVID-19, the Miami Marlins returned with enough force to reach the playoffs for the first time since their 2003 championship.
    foxnews.com
  18. Republican Senators Pen Letter To Netflix Over ‘GoT’ Creators’ New Series ‘The Three-Body Problem’ The senators pointed to an interview that author Liu Cixin had once given which they interpreted as pro-Chinese Communist Party (CCP).
    nypost.com
  19. Who Approves Supreme Court Nominees? Nomination Process, Votes for Trump Pick Explained After a debate at the Constitutional Convention, members decided to give the power of nominating a justice to the president but the ability to reject or accept the nomination to the Senate.
    newsweek.com
  20. Dalvin Cook’s breakdown of Devonta Freeman should soothe Giants Life After Saquon Barkley officially begins now for the 2020 New York Football Giants. Life After Saquon Barkley begins Sunday against the decimated 49ers with Daniel Jones promising he won’t try to carry the team, and the day. It begins with Joe Judge asking for complementary football from his defense and special teams, because he...
    nypost.com
  21. Perfect prep: Halep takes 14-match win streak to French Open Two months of physical training. Then three months of practice on clay courts. Followed by two straight titles on the red dirt.
    foxnews.com
  22. Breonna Taylor's autopsy report reveals how Louisville police shots killed her Breonna Taylor was struck six times by Louisville Metro police bullets, including in the artery connecting her heart to her lungs.        
    usatoday.com
  23. Pennsylvania Governor Blasts 'Unsafe' Trump Rally to Follow Supreme Court Announcement After he is expected to announce his Supreme Court nominee, the president will hold a rally in Pennsylvania that the governor has criticized for not following COVID guidelines.
    newsweek.com
  24. COVID-19 forces Texas A&M to keep fans out of Midnight Yell Texas A&M’s five Yell Leaders ran into an almost empty Kyle Field as Friday night crept into Saturday morning for their Midnight Yell.
    foxnews.com
  25. Trump Must Stop Criticizing Scientists Amid COVID-19 Vaccine Talks: Experts to FDA More than two dozen said they were concerned about decision-making at the agency.
    newsweek.com
  26. ‘Auntie’ Taylor Swift sends Gigi Hadid’s newborn homemade blanket Gigi Hadid and Zayn Malik welcomed their newborn daughter to the world last week. Several friends and family have reached out to the couple to celebrate her arrival, including “auntie” Taylor Swift. The singer, 30, sent a homemade pink satin blanket to the infant, for which 25-year-old Hadid thanked her via Instagram. Swift also sent...
    nypost.com
  27. Astros clinch final AL playoff spot despite loss to Rangers Ryan Pressly had no interest in waiting to see if the Astros would get the help they needed to clinch the last spot in the expanded American League playoffs after the Houston reliever couldn’t finish it himself when he was a strike away.
    foxnews.com
  28. The latest on 2020 election and SCOTUS battle As the US election draws near, the race between President Trump and Joe Biden heats up. Here's the latest news around campaigns, SCOTUS vacancy, voting and more.
    edition.cnn.com
  29. New study says US is nowhere near COVID-19 herd immunity About a third of New Yorkers and less than a tenth of American adults were exposed to the coronavirus by the end of July, a new study of dialysis patients found. That level is far from the “herd immunity” many are hoping will help end restrictions aimed at slowing the spread of the virus that...
    nypost.com