Εργαλεία

US health chief to make most senior visit to Taiwan in decades

United States Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar will lead a delegation to Taiwan, his office announced Tuesday, in a high-level trip that is almost certain to anger Beijing, which claims the self-governing island as part of its territory.
Lataa lisää
Lue koko artikkeli aiheesta: edition.cnn.com
Jets’ injury mess is as bad as they feared
The signs weren’t encouraging all week, but Jets coach Adam Gase confirmed that wide receivers Jamison Crowder and Breshad Perriman, as well as right tackle George Fant will not play in Sunday’s game in Indianapolis. “Yeah, they’re not going to be able to go,” Gase said when asked about the two wideouts before practice Friday....
nypost.com
Paris Police Suspect Terrorism In Attack Near Former 'Charlie Hebdo' Offices
An arrest has been made in the incident outside the building where a dozen people were gunned down in 2015 in apparent retaliation for the publication of cartoons that satirized the Prophet Muhammad.
npr.org
The future of the vote
Tara Jacoby for Vox Tech and our democracy are more connected than ever before. The 2020 presidential election was always going to be a pivotal moment for our country. Then the Covid-19 pandemic’s human and economic tolls raised the stakes. The pandemic also accelerated a shift that was already happening: It made technology an even bigger factor in the future of our democracy. Some of this won’t surprise you. In 2016, as then-presidential contender Donald Trump amassed attention and supporters on his way to the White House, Americans on both sides of the political aisle started grasping in real time how powerful a tool the internet is for politicians and their supporters. We also realized that nefarious actors, many of them linked to foreign governments, were exploiting major online platforms like Facebook and Twitter to spread misinformation, exacerbate political tensions, and interfere with the United States’ electoral process. In the four years since, tech companies and their leaders have pledged to be better prepared in 2020, and to prevent their platforms and tools from being used to mess with our democracy. But that’s a daunting task. Tech companies are still lagging behind in an ever-evolving situation, and election misinformation keeps spreading. On top of all that, the pandemic has created a host of unforeseen challenges as in-person campaigning has shifted almost entirely online and as more Americans than ever before are expected to vote by mail. Open Sourced’s Future of the Vote project explores the consequences of our political world’s inextricable links to the tech world and explains what you should watch out for online ahead of November 3. —Samantha Oltman, Recode editor
vox.com
Amy Coney Barrett's People of Praise and the Role of Women, According to Former Members
People who once belonged to the self-described charismatic Christian community told Newsweek women are expected to be "absolutely obedient" to their husbands as well as male leaders.
newsweek.com
Christina El Moussa deletes wedding photos after split from Ant Anstead
Anstead still has a photo of their wedding day posted to his own Instagram page.
nypost.com
Queen Elizabeth II to trim costs as royal family faces $45 million hit from coronavirus pandemic
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and her family are facing a $45 million hit in revenues from the coronavirus pandemic.        
usatoday.com
'The Comey Rule' shows off a sensational cast in a slightly uneven miniseries
"The Comey Rule" employs a clunky framing device, turning Rod Rosenstein into the awkward narrator of the story. Brilliant casting from top to bottom, however, elevates this two-part Showtime adaptation of former FBI director James Comey's book, which adopts a sympathetic stance toward the no-win scenario the bureau faced with its twin investigations into presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.
edition.cnn.com
Ahead of Election, Unemployment Is Falling Faster in Sharpest Obama-Trump Swing Counties
The unemployment rate in some of the counties that swung most from Obama to Trump is better than the U.S. average.
newsweek.com
Disclosure Doesn’t Work on a Shameless President
Again and again, President Donald Trump has violated, evaded, or ignored the law. The Constitution says a president cannot accept payments from foreign governments, but Trump did. The Constitution says that the principal officers of executive departments—members of the Cabinet—must be confirmed by the Senate. Trump junked that rule too, relying instead on his power to appoint temporary acting officials. A century and a half of legal precedents establish that a president must generally comply with subpoenas from Congress, even if he does not like the questions. Again, Trump disregarded seemingly established law.Courts have sometimes checked the Trump presidency, but not always. But court decisions take years to decide and longer to enforce. In July, the Supreme Court ruled that Congress and New York State prosecutors could legally subpoena Trump’s accountants and bankers for his financial records—a ruling that was followed by yet more Trump litigation seeking to challenge, or at least delay, the subpoenas. Even impeachment did not restrain Trump. His strong grip on his party—and on a sufficient minority of the American public—protected him from the Constitution’s ultimate remedy.The Trump presidency has exposed the degree to which presidential compliance with law is voluntary. The American system relies heavily on the president’s own sense of honor and integrity, on the president’s own wish to do what is right. The Trump presidency demonstrated how inadequate are custom and tradition to restrain a president determined to do wrong.Half a century ago, Congress and many states enacted ambitious reforms in response to Watergate and other abuses of government power. The dominant theme of those 1970s reforms was disclosure. Politicians would disclose more of their personal finances. Parties and campaigns would disclose more of their donations. Executive-branch agencies would disclose more to Congress. Congress would open more of its committee meetings to public view, and the sessions of the House and Senate to television cameras.“Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants,” Louis Brandeis wrote in 1913, and the reformers of the 1970s adopted that motto as their own.Over the past half century, some of those disclosure mechanisms have deteriorated. The fog of dark money has considerably obscured election finance, for example.But sunlight disinfects only when the general public and elite stakeholders care about what is disclosed. In the Trump years, that assumption of the reformist creed of the 1970s has repeatedly proved false. Scandal after scandal has come to light, without Trump suffering political consequences severe enough to deter or correct corrupt behaviorTrump has done his best to defeat disclosure, notably by refusing to release his tax returns. Still, the main elements of Trump’s behavior in office have become visible. There is no exact count of the public money that has flowed into Trump businesses, but at a minimum it exceeds $1.1 million. There is no count at all of the money Trump has collected from foreign governments, but it has been disclosed that representatives of 22 foreign nations have stayed at his properties. It became a public scandal that he tried to score a massive international payday for himself by holding the 2020 G7 summit at a golf resort he owns in Florida. There has been some disclosure of the flow of Republican Party funds to Trump businesses: at least $17 million since 2016. It’s murkier how much Trump pocketed from his 2017 inauguration committee, but court documents suggest that the figure might be substantial.Likewise, the defiance of congressional subpoenas happened in plain sight. Trump brought that fight to the Supreme Court and lost—but bought himself enough time to postpone any response until after the 2020 election. Many of the worst outrages of the Trump years were blurted by the president himself on live television: Yes, he fired FBI Director James Comey in order to thwart an investigation of Trump’s Russia connections; yes, he asked China and Ukraine to deliver dirt on his most likely presidential election opponent; yes, he wants to cram through a last-minute Supreme Court appointment to help him in the legal battles he expects after the 2020 vote. Americans saw and heard all this. Many cared. But not all. And not enough.Post-Watergate America was a country characterized by a strong center and weak partisanship. During the Watergate scandal, a president elected by almost 60 percent of the vote lost office when proof of his personal involvement in criminal activity turned the leaders of his own party against him. That’s a vanished world. The America of the 2020s is more polarized and partisan than at any time since the aftermath of the Civil War. Trump was elected by 46 percent of the vote, and nothing—good or bad—has much moved the dial ever since. In 2017, 2018, and the first half of 2019, Trump presided over the best economy since the late 1990s. His average approval rating never reached even 50 percent. In 2020, Trump presided over the worst sequence of disasters since the early 1930s. His poll numbers never dipped below 40 percent. When he was caught dead to rights in the Ukraine scandal, his party stayed loyal to him, with the exception of only a single senator. When he brazenly violated the law and delivered his nomination acceptance speech from the South Lawn of the White House, his party leadership all joined him there. When he was recorded admitting that he had knowingly underplayed the worst pandemic in a century, there was hardly a murmur of reproach from his own side.Disclosure assumes a political system that cares about the things disclosed. And that is not the political system the United States has in 2020.That insight is the basis for a new sequence of political reforms proposed by House Democrats September 23, the Protecting Our Democracy Act of 2020. The bill proposes more than a dozen measures to address specific abuses of the Trump years. And for the most part, disclosure alone is not considered a sufficient remedy.The first measure would restrict the presidential pardon power. It would prohibit self-pardon by the president, clarify that it is indeed illegal for a president to sell pardons, and require release to Congress of information about any pardon from which the president or his family might personally benefit.The second measure would stop the clock on statutes of limitations for any federal crime committed by the president or vice president. Because current rules forbid prosecuting the president for federal crimes, it’s unfair that he can use his period in office to outrun federal crimes he might have committed before or during his tenure.The third measure would codify the emoluments clause of the U.S. Constitution into statute. Trump brazenly and nakedly violated the clause. But the clause is not self-executing. The Constitution insists that the president should not accept payments from foreign governments. It offers no guidance as to what should happen if a president goes ahead and does it anyway. The third measure also restricts the president’s ability to pocket money from domestic interests, such as a party committee or party candidates.The fourth puts teeth into congressional subpoena powers. As things stand, it’s up to the executive branch to enforce subpoenas—which has proved quite a problem when it is the executive branch that decides to ignore them. The new proposal would allow Congress to bypass the executive and ask courts to impose fines on defiant officeholders.The fifth would reduce the president’s scope to redirect money that Congress voted to spend on one purpose and to instead spend it on a different purpose.The sixth would curtail the vast agglomeration of emergency powers horrifyingly detailed in The Atlantic back in 2019.The seventh—this one does rest on disclosure—would require the attorney general to keep a log of his or her contacts with the White House and provide that log to the Department of Justice’s inspector general twice a year.The eighth would clarify that inspectors general may be removed only for cause. It would require the president to provide documentation of that cause to Congress before the removal went into effect.The ninth would protect whistleblowers and clarify that it is indeed legal for whistleblowers to provide information directly to the relevant committee of Congress.The 10th would limit the maximum tenure of acting Cabinet officials to 120 days.The 11th would eliminate the courtesy that leaves enforcement of the Hatch Act to the president when White House personnel are involved. Trump abused this courtesy to free his staff to do political work at taxpayer expense. This measure also raises the maximum fine under the Hatch Act to $50,000 and expedites collection of those fines.The 12th and 13th measures impose new requirements on campaigns, candidates, and their families to report foreign contacts—and clarifies that it is, yes, illegal for a U.S. campaign to accept dirt on political adversaries from foreign persons and governments.You probably imagined that many of these proposals were law already. Arguably, many of them were. But a lot of existing anti-corruption law was informative or indicative, rather than punitive.In a lecture delivered in 1897, the future Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. said that to truly understand the law, “you must look at it as a bad man, who cares only for the material consequences which such knowledge enables him to predict, not as a good one, who finds his reasons for conduct, whether inside the law or outside of it, in the vaguer sanctions of conscience.”Until now, however, the law around the presidency did not work that way. “Thou shalt not take foreign emoluments” may impress the honest and patriotic president. But what if the president is not honest or patriotic? What happens if that president accepts a foreign emolument? The answer turned out to be: nothing much. As a result, a dishonest and unpatriotic president grabbed with both hands, and corrupted one of the two great political parties to acquiesce.The House Democrats’ reform bill obviously will not be enacted as long as Donald Trump can wield a veto. But if Trump is ejected in this year’s election and the Senate Republicans who protected him lose their majority, the reform bill—or much of it—may become law.I’ve gone into some detail about the House Democrats’ bill to underscore how moderate it is, how respectful it is of the important prerogatives of a legitimate presidency. The bill does not, to cite just one example, forbid the president to talk to the attorney general about particular cases (although in almost every case, the president should refrain from doing that). It does not require the attorney general to inform Congress about such conversations. That would compromise the cohesion of the executive branch. It requires only that a record be kept, that it be shared at intervals with the Department of Justice’s own preexisting watchdog, the inspector general—and that it be available for later inspection by Congress if needed.The bill does not, to cite another example, empower Congress to enforce its own subpoenas by inherent authority, as 19th-century Congresses sometimes did. That could easily lead to abuses of individual rights. Congressional subpoenas will be enforced in court, and the penalties for defying subpoenas imposed only by courts.The bill does not, to take a third example, blur the status of inspectors general as executive-branch employees. It changes their status to make them more like civil servants, less like political appointees—but still chosen by, and answerable to, the executive, not Congress.Much of the bill deals with things that most of us had supposed were already rules: the president should not sell pardons, for example, or use them as part of a cover-up scheme. But it turned out that rules against corrupt pardoning had been voluntarily adopted by past presidents. If a president did not want to comply, the rule could not readily be enforced against him.In a way, you could read the bill as the Yes, Donald Trump Was a Criminal Act of 2021.And that suggests two of the bill’s maybe inevitable but still poignant unintended consequences.First, most of the Protecting Our Democracy Act is mind-crushingly morally obvious: Don’t accept clandestine political information from foreign governments. Don’t use the White House for your convention speech. The act of writing such basics into law in 2021 would lend some credibility to the future arguments of Trump’s enablers: Yes, much of what President Trump did was distasteful, but it was not strictly illegal. That’s why the country had to write new laws in 2021. I was as appalled as anybody else, but there was nothing to do—the president was acting within his rights as those rights existed at the time.That argument is mostly false. Donald Trump did violate existing law. It was not in fact legal for him to use his official powers to extort foreign governments to fabricate political dirt on his political opponents—that was already prohibited by many laws. The problem was that the enforcement of those laws depended on mechanisms that had rusted out. It will be important to underscore that point in the future. What went wrong in the Trump era was not that the president delicately tiptoed around the law. What went wrong in the Trump era was that the cops in charge of the law were asleep, or senile, or in cahoots with the president.Second, the Protecting Our Democracy Act amounts to a confession that the impeachment power is a dead letter. The House imposed the severest sanction a Congress can impose against an errant president. At trial, however, the president’s co-partisans protected him from removal—and after the trial, the president resumed his lawbreaking.There have now been four serious presidential impeachment processes in U.S. history: Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon, Bill Clinton, and Donald Trump. In retrospect, it’s clear that the important variable in the outcome was the state of party politics at the time of the impeachment.The Nixon-Trump contrast is starkest. If Congress worked in the 2020s as it had in the 1970s, important Republicans would have broken ranks with Trump, and forced his resignation. If Congress worked in the 1970s as it does in the 2020s, Nixon would have served out his term. We have fully arrived at the predicament that Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz warned of in their book on the impeachment process: When impeachment is most needed, it is least likely to be effective; when it is most likely to be effective, it is least needed.And so, the House Democrats are making do with a fallback remedy, a second-best or third-best.These reforms are all welcome and necessary. It’s a sad reflection on the state of U.S. politics that they are needed at all. The Founders imagined that Congress could set aside political partialities to act as a court of law upon an unfit president. That hope has proved one of their less workable ideas. Americans need to accept some sad realities about the state of their law and politics. That means new legislation that works around the defects of the impeachment remedy—and takes into account the grim fact of 21st-century hyper-partisanship.
theatlantic.com
US, UK reportedly set to announce new AI partnership
The Trump administration is set to announce that the United States and the United Kingdom have signed a new agreement to cooperate on research and development on artificial intelligence, Axios reported on Friday.
nypost.com
2 charged over virus outbreak at veterans home where 76 died
Since March, 76 veterans who contracted COVID-19 at Holyoke Soldiers' Home have died.
cbsnews.com
Channing Tatum and his abs return to work
Channing Tatum’s abs are back in business.
nypost.com
Trump's Supreme Court pick could turn back the clock on civil rights
Vanita Gupta writes that President Trump's next Supreme Court nominee could roll back progress on critical civil rights issues -- from LGBTQ rights to disability rights -- and blunt the positive change so many Americans seek.
edition.cnn.com
UFC 253 video: Dominick Reyes, Jan Blachowicz intense at final faceoff
Dominick Reyes and Jan Blachowicz look ready to decide a new light heavyweight champion at UFC 253.        Related StoriesUFC 253 video: Dominick Reyes, Jan Blachowicz on mark for vacant 205 title fightUFC 253 video: Israel Adesanya, Paulo Costa have to be separatedUFC 253 faceoffs live video stream (11 a.m. ET) 
usatoday.com
Carole Baskin's Next 'Dancing With the Stars' Song Is 'The Circle of Life' But It Has a Morbid Message
Here's why the "Tiger King" star may cry while dancing.
newsweek.com
Pentagon is adamant it will not play a role in settling election disputes
President Donald Trump this week refused to commit to a peaceful transition should he lose the November election, leading some to speculate that he might seek to use the tools of presidential power including his role as commander in chief of the armed forces to prolong his time in office.
edition.cnn.com
As Trump refuses to commit to a peaceful transition, Pentagon stresses it will play no role in the election
President Donald Trump this week refused to commit to a peaceful transition should he lose the November election, leading some to speculate that he might seek to use the tools of presidential power including his role as commander in chief of the armed forces to prolong his time in office.
edition.cnn.com
Trapped inside the Star Motel
Even before the pandemic, Orlando was plagued by a lack of affordable housing. Then Florida’s tourism economy crashed, leaving hundreds of people trapped in rundown motels on the edge of society.
washingtonpost.com
As SEC football season opens, expect shows of unity but no anthem protests on field
SEC football teams won't likely be on the field, as usual, during the national anthem in 2020, but expect players to make shows of unity.       
usatoday.com
Skateboarding icon and streetwear founder Keith Hufnagel dies at 46
The world of skateboarding has lost an icon and entrepreneur with the death of Keith Hufnagel at the age of 46.
edition.cnn.com
Breonna Taylor's family demands release of grand jury transcripts
Breonna Taylor's family peaks out after a Kentucky grand jury indicted one officer for allegedly endangering Taylor's neighbors.
abcnews.go.com
Trump Lower than Obama, Xi and Putin in Poll Revealing World's Most Admired Men
Obama deposed Bill Gates from the top slot in the YouGov poll of more than 45,000 people across 42 countries and territories.
newsweek.com
Nintendo ramping up Switch production after months of shortages
The Nintendo Switch console has been among the hottest tech products this year. But months into the pandemic, the Switch is still proving had to find.       
usatoday.com
Peter Navarro: 'Joe Biden Should Have Known Better' than to Slash Pensions for 20K Delphi Workers
White House trade adviser Peter Navarro says Democrat presidential candidate Joe Biden "should have known better" than to sit by and watch pensions get slashed for about 20,000 Delphi workers.
breitbart.com
UN Human Rights Council Ignores Real Abuses to Attack Israel | Opinion
The Human Rights Council reserves a spot on its agenda to condemn the Jewish state—the sole country-specific item—whereas human rights issues in the entire rest of the world are shoved into one solitary agenda item.
newsweek.com
Bruce LeVell Previews Trump's Platinum Plan for Black Economic Empowerment
Bruce LeVell, executive director of the Trump National Diversity Coalition, previewed President Donald Trump's forthcoming address outlining the administration's Platinum Plan for Black Economic Empowerment in an interview on Friday's edition of SiriusXM's Breitbart News Daily with host Alex Marlow.
breitbart.com
Who Is Barbara Lagoa, A Top Contender For Trump's Supreme Court Pick?
The Florida judge has been on the federal bench for just about a year. She became controversial for not recusing herself from a felon voting rights case.
npr.org
Kevin Harvick's NASCAR season isn't so silly
Stewart-Haas Racing driver leads the field as playoffs enter Round of 12.
foxnews.com
A teacher's aide who worked with special needs students, and her brother, a paramedic, died from coronavirus just one day apart
Gerald "Jerry" Jones, 51, was a longtime paramedic in Volusia County, Florida. His sister, Shyla Pennington, 41, was a teaching assistant at Volusia County Schools.
edition.cnn.com
Demi Lovato and Max Ehrich call it quits after 2-month engagement
Singer-songwriter Demi Lovato and actor Max Ehrich end their engagement. The pair had been dating since March, and Ehrich proposed in July.
latimes.com
Lili Reinhart thinks everyone is bisexual
"I'm like, 'Isn’t everyone bisexual?'"
nypost.com
Is the Apple Face Mask For Sale?
The Apple face mask was designed by the engineering teams that usually work on iPhones and iPads.
newsweek.com
Fall night sky to offer wondrous celestial sights from Halloween ‘blue moon’ to dazzling meteor showers
With multiple meteor showers, including arguably the year’s best, along with full moons, planetary appearances, and flyovers of the International Space Station, there’s plenty to enjoy by looking up.
washingtonpost.com
McDonald's and Cactus Jack launch Twitter contest for a chance to win Travis Scott action figures
Want a Travis Scott action figure?McDonald's has a new Twitter sweepstakes where five Cactus Jack action figures are up for grabs.       
usatoday.com
UFC 253 video: Israel Adesanya, Paulo Costa have to be separated
Israel Adesanya and Paulo Costa got one final look at each other ahead of Saturday's middleweight title fight at UFC 253.        Related StoriesUFC 253 video: Watch champ Israel Adesanya, challenger Paulo Costa make weightUFC 253 faceoffs live video stream (11 a.m. ET)UFC 253 video: Dominick Reyes, Jan Blachowicz on mark for vacant 205 title fight 
usatoday.com
Biden's low-key campaign style worries some Democrats
The final stretch of a presidential campaign is typically a nonstop mix of travel, caffeine and adrenaline. But as the worst pandemic in a century bears down on the United States, Joe Biden is taking a lower key approach.
foxnews.com
Donald Trump said there were 'unbelievable undercover operatives' in the Florida crowd Thursday. What?
President Donald Trump sometimes, well, just says stuff.
edition.cnn.com
Are you running into voting problems? Let us know.
The Washington Post is partnering with ProPublica to hear what problems voters — that’s you — are encountering when trying to vote in the general election.
washingtonpost.com
Prepare for the GRE, LSAT and SAT with this all-in-one test prep bundle
If you want to go to a highly selective university, whether for an undergraduate program, to get your master’s or to earn a law degree, then you need entrance exam scores that stand out. Unfortunately, these exams are not cheap. Enrolling to take the LSAT, for example, will run you $200, and prep courses are...
nypost.com
Who is Jacob Busch? Meet Rebel Wilson’s boyfriend
Let's get to her new fellow.
nypost.com
The mask barons of Etsy
How a couple of mom-and-pop shops made millions off masks https://www.theverge.com/21446951/etsy-mask-sales-sellers-shops-garment-industry-los-angeles
vox.com
Bellator Europe 8 weigh-in results: Edwards, Van Steenis, full card hit marks
Check out the results from the official Bellator Europe 8 fighter weigh-ins.        Related Stories1-year-old boy receives life-saving treatment, with help of Bellator's 'Pitbull' brothers1-year-old boy receives life-saving treatment, with help of Bellator's 'Pitbull' brothers - EnclosureUFC 253 video: Israel Adesanya, Paulo Costa have to be separated 
usatoday.com
Mueller team FBI agent: Flynn prosecution had ‘get Trump’ vibe, collusion ‘dead end’
An FBI official who worked on former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election believed some investigators had a “get Trump” attitude and that the probe was a “dead end,” according to a report. FBI agent William Barnett slammed the Trump-Russia collusion inquiry as “opaque” and described it as having...
nypost.com
Meghan Markle reportedly has serious ambitions to run for president
"Meghan is the embodiment of the American dream."
nypost.com
Take an extra 15% off sale during Boll & Branch's End of Season event
Boll & Branch is known for high-quality, organic bedding, and you can save now through September 30 with an extra 15% off sale items during Boll & Branch's End of Season Sale.
edition.cnn.com
My brother Austin asked me to go to Syria with him. Four months later, he was taken.
Journalist Austin Tice went missing after being detained in Syria eight years ago. His brother Jacob writes of Austin's request to join him in that country--and of the time with Austin their family has missed.
edition.cnn.com
Biden's Swing Voter Problem Isn't SCOTUS. It's the First Election Debate | Analysis
While pundits are obsessing about the nomination battle for RGB's replacement, an analysis of social media conversations shows swing voters are much more interested in seeing how Biden will perform against Trump.
newsweek.com
Coronavirus cases top 800,000 in California, highest in the nation
The state also surpassed 15,000 COVID-19 deaths this week, among the highest numbers in the nation.
latimes.com