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St. Louis prosecutor who charged couple for displaying weapons wins Democratic primary

The polarizing St. Louis prosecutor who charged a couple for flashing guns at a crowd marching to the mayor's home last month has been elected to another term following Tuesday's primary election.
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Lue koko artikkeli aiheesta: foxnews.com
ISS forced to make emergency maneuver to dodge space debris
The International Space Station was forced into an emergency maneuver last night to avoid a catastrophic collision with a rogue piece of space debris. NASA said crew took shelter while controllers worked to urgently adjust the course of the floating lab, which orbits roughly 260 miles above Earth. An American and a pair of Russians...
nypost.com
COVID-19 mutation may be evolving to bypass mask-wearing, hand washing
Scientists in a paper published Wednesday identified a new strain of the virus, which accounted for 99.9 percent of cases during the second wave in the Houston, Texas area.
nypost.com
'They've carried us': Cincinnati Reds players thank cheering grounds crew after final home game
Reds players thanked their lively grounds crew after their last home game. Joey Votto: "They've carried us at times when we need energy."       
usatoday.com
Second former Taylor campaign staffer pleads guilty to 2018 election fraud in Va.
Roberta Marciano is one of three former campaign staffers implicated in the 2018 scandal.
washingtonpost.com
UAB vs. South Alabama line, prediction: QB injury will be the difference
Redshirt freshman Bryson Lucero takes over for injured Blazers quarterback Tyler Johnston III.
nypost.com
Critical race theory, and Trump’s war on it, explained
President Trump speaks during a White House Conference on American History at the National Archives on September 17. | Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images Trump has attacked diversity training, critical race theory, the 1619 project, and anything that reckons with America’s racist past. The Trump administration kicked off September by launching an assault on critical race theory and diversity training — and is now capping off the month by doubling down on its promises. After a string of related tweets Tuesday, Trump issued an executive order banning federal contractors from conducting racial sensitivity training, emphasizing his desire to stop “efforts to indoctrinate government employees with divisive and harmful sex- and race-based ideologies.” The administration’s war against “race-based ideologies” — code for theories and practices that examine the racism in American history and institutions — started on September 4 when Office of Management and Budget (OMB) director Russell Vought, at Trump’s behest, released a memo instructing federal agencies to identify any critical race theory and white privilege training within their departmental training plans. According to the memo, the administration’s mission is to stop funding any and all programming that suggests the “United States is an inherently racist or evil country or that any race or ethnicity is inherently racist or evil.” Now, with Trump’s newly expanded ban on such training sessions, which he has called “divisive, un-American propaganda,” the administration is signaling that Americans, and even those who run the government, don’t need to understand the country’s racist founding — from the genocide of Native Americans to the enslavement of Africans — and the role the past plays in how racism persists today. On September 17, as part of the White House Conference on American History, Trump went all-in on “defend[ing] the legacy of America’s founding, the virtue of America’s heroes, and the nobility of the American character,” taking time to denounce the New York Times’s 1619 project that focused on the lasting impact of slavery in America; historian Howard Zinn, who penned the influential A People’s History of the United States, about America’s story from the perspective of the oppressed; and critical race theory. “They’ve lumped everything together: critical race theory, the 1619 project, whiteness studies, talking about white privilege,” Kimberlé Crenshaw, a founding critical race theorist and UCLA and Columbia University law professor, told Vox. “What they have in common is they are discourses that refuse to participate in the lie that America has triumphantly overcome its racist history, that everything is behind us. None of these projects accept that it’s all behind us.” As to why the Trump administration is suddenly up in arms about racial bias training and critical race theory — a framework that’s existed for about 40 years — the OMB memo cites press reports as factors in Trump’s decision. In July, Fox News began airing segments featuring conservative activist Christopher F. Rufo, who in mid-August told Tucker Carlson that he was “declaring a one-man war against critical race theory in the federal government, and I’m not going to stop these investigations until we can abolish it within our public institutions.” He tweeted on August 20, “My goal is simple: to persuade the President of the United States to issue an executive order abolishing critical race theory in the federal government.” Rufo appeared on Carlson’s show once more on September 2, just two days before the memo’s release. Conservative media celebrated the document as a win; in response to a Breitbart article about the memo, Trump tweeted on September 5: “This is a sickness that cannot be allowed to continue. Please report any sightings so we can quickly extinguish!” While it might be tempting to brush off the administration’s latest crusade as inconsequential amid a flurry of other happenings — like his intentionally misleading the American public on the Covid-19 pandemic or the rush to fill the vacant Supreme Court seat — Trump’s directive had already taken effect even before the executive order. A scheduled unconscious bias training, programming meant to help workers recognize and tackle discriminatory behavior, at the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division has been postponed, according to MarketWatch. Meanwhile, Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) has urged a Senate Judiciary hearing on Trump’s push to roll back anti-racial bias training for federal government employees. However, as much as Trump would like to systematically ban critical race theory, it won’t be so easy; the framework is rooted in how a large body of scholars and thinkers see the world. In fact, in a time when systemic injustice has been brought to the fore, the broader public is only just beginning to look at America through such a critical lens. Critical race theory is a framework for grappling with racial power and white supremacy in America Critical race theory grew out of a generational response to the ebb and flow of the civil rights movement, according to a seminal 1993 book on the theory, Words That Wound: Critical Race Theory, Assaultive Speech, and the First Amendment. Though the authors — Mari Matsuda, Charles R. Lawrence III, Richard Delgado, and Kimberlé Crenshaw — don’t pinpoint an exact date for when critical race theory first entered the collective consciousness, the book notes the late 1970s as a time when “the civil rights movement of the 1960s had stalled, and many of its gains were being rolled back.” That’s when a post-civil rights generation of scholars recognized that while segregation had been modestly repealed, there was still inequality to be addressed. America wanted to frame itself as a society that was committed to equality, but fewer legal battles were being won by civil rights advocates and white people began claiming that remedies for racial discrimination were violating their civil rights. “Individual law teachers and students committed to racial justice began to meet, to talk, to write, and to engage in political action in an effort to confront and oppose dominant societal and institutional forces that maintained the structures of racism while professing the goal of dismantling racial discrimination,” the authors wrote. Matsuda, Lawrence, Delgado, and Crenshaw — who identified themselves as a collective of African American, Chicano, and Asian American “outsider law teachers” — defined critical race theory as a movement and framework that recognizes how racism is “endemic” to American life. In other words, critical race theory rejects the belief that “what’s in the past is in the past” and that the best way to get beyond race is to stop talking about it. Instead, America must reckon with how its values and institutions feed into racism. Critical race theory was also a lens through which these legal scholars could analyze policies and the law,accepting that “racism has contributed to all contemporary manifestations of group advantage and disadvantage along racial lines,” like differences in income, incarceration rates, health outcomes, housing, educational opportunities, political representation, and military service. The ultimate goal was to eliminate racial oppression as part of the broader mission of ending all kinds of oppression — including that based on class or sexual orientation. According to the authors, it’s not enough to just make adjustments within established hierarchies; it’s necessary to challenge the hierarchies themselves. The framework is also skeptical of the belief that colorblindness — not seeing race — is a solution to racism. This stems from the belief that race itself is not biological but socially constructed. In other words, race isn’t inherent or natural. “So if race is not biological, how is being colorblind a solution to the problem of racism?” Crenshaw told Vox. As critical race theory brewed in academic circles for years, its first moment of social action can be traced back to 1981, when students boycotted Harvard Law School to persuade the administration to increase the number of tenured professors of color at the school. When professor Derrick Bell left the law school at the time, there was no one to teach his groundbreaking course “Race, Racism, and American Law.” To fill the gap, students organized an alternative course and invited guest lecturers to teach from Bell’s book by the same name. This course was just one catalyst that developed critical race theory as a movement — and as a community that served as refuge from a largely white legal field. Critical race theorists would come to adopt ideas from a number of schools of thought — liberalism, Marxism, critical legal studies, feminism, postmodernism — to establish itself. There have been previous efforts to eliminate critical race theory prior to Trump, with criticism coming from thinkers on both the left and the right. Critics on the left questioned how scholars could theorize something that is a social construction. “We had significant debate with folks who see class as the singular axis of subordination,” Crenshaw told Vox. “But class is not natural. It’s also a construction that has legal ramifications. If you can analyze law and other systems to show how class relations are reproduced, and you call that critical legal theory, then why can’t we pay attention to the way that racial power is reproduced through law?” Conservatives, on the other hand, claimed that remedying problems like segregation and affirmative action was reverse discrimination, and that race-based remedies were overcorrecting and creating new victims — mostly white men who were made to feel that they had lost what they have long had a right to. Over time, critical race theory has spread to countless disciplines (from education to political science to sociology), looked at race in relation to other constructs (gender, class, and sexuality), and has long crossed international borders. Critical race theory is vast, established, and simply cannot be canceled. Critical race theory is a decades-long response from people who have been historically shut out in all corners of American society. “To think that you’re going to just go and round it all up is like trying to put your hands around water. It just shows you know nothing about water, to think that all you can do is just round it all up with your arms,” Crenshaw said. Trump’s assault on critical race theory shouldn’t be ignored The Trump administration’s attempt to clamp down on critical race theory and unconscious bias training, which are related but in no way the same things, is part of his larger push to convince Americans that there is a conspiracy on the part of academics, activists, and journalists on the left to rewrite history. “Let’s face it, so many people believe in conspiracy theories now. So now that [Trump] has ginned up all this angst over conspiracies to take away people’s rights, he’s really scaling it up,” Crenshaw said. According to Crenshaw, at the foundation of many of these theories is a psychological insecurity on the part of white people who fear their racial status is being threatened. Historically, the tendency has been for white people to align with whiteness, even across class lines, Crenshaw noted. “What remains to be seen is whether the resistance to it is nearly as powerful as the tendency toward it.” Trump drove the tendency home in his address at the White House Conference on American History, acknowledging that he plans to take this fight beyond federal contractors and into America’s schools with an executive order that bolsters “patriotic education.” “Critical race theory is being forced into our children’s schools, it’s being imposed into workplace trainings, and it’s being deployed to rip apart friends, neighbors, and families,” Trump said. “Teaching this horrible doctrine to our children is a form of child abuse in the truest sense of those words.” Trump wants his critics to accept the status quo —that we already live in a fair and just America—Crenshaw said. Yet critical race theory remains relevant as people in cities and small towns across the country lead ongoing protests for Black lives following the death of George Floyd in late May. Americans and organizations have pledged to become anti-racist, to actively recognize how silence or inaction amounts to complicity. Activists are also pushing for anti-racist education in schools and anti-racism trainings in workplaces, and many would argue that Trump cannot stop the larger moving tide. “Our failure to cease and desist from linking this present to a problematic past is un-American. It is propaganda [according to Trump],” Crenshaw told Vox. “The best propaganda is something that calls the truth propaganda.” Help keep Vox free for all Millions turn to Vox each month to understand what’s happening in the news, from the coronavirus crisis to a racial reckoning to what is, quite possibly, the most consequential presidential election of our lifetimes. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone make sense of an increasingly chaotic world: Contribute today from as little as $3.
vox.com
26-year-old suspect arrested in shooting that injured 2 Louisville police officers
Police have arrested a 26-year-old suspect in the shooting of two police officers during protests in Louisville, Kentucky, over the charging decision in the case of Breonna Taylor.
edition.cnn.com
Meet Hunter Fieri, Guy Fieri’s son and the ‘Prince of Flavortown’
Guy Fieri's got an heir to his dine-asty His son, Hunter Fieri — the self-proclaimed "Prince of Flavortown" — is ready to rock the frosted-tipped crown and take his place as a veritable Food Network star.
nypost.com
Kentucky officials working to release more information in Breonna Taylor case
Kentucky officials are working to make public more information in the Breonna Taylor investigation, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said Thursday, as fallout continued over the grand-jury decision not to directly indict any cops in her death. “What we’re doing is working with the attorney general and … the FBI to understand what we can release...
nypost.com
What to watch on Friday: ‘The Great British Baking Show’ on Netflix
Friday September 25, 2020 | “A Wilderness of Error” on FX.
washingtonpost.com
Texas Gov. Abbott proposes stiffer penalties for rioters, including automatic jail for striking officer
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott proposed stiffer penalties for violent protesters and rioters, suggesting legislation that stipulates an automatic six months in jail for causing harm to a police officer. 
foxnews.com
How Kentucky state law impacts the case of Breonna Taylor
After a Kentucky grand jury decided not to charge Louisville police officers with the death of Breonna Taylor, protests erupted in cities across the country. Jamiles Lartey, a staff writer at The Marshall Project, joins CBSN to explore the legal layers surrounding the case.
cbsnews.com
Merab Dvalishvili vs. Cody Stamann joins UFC's Dec. 5 lineup
A bantamweight matchup between Merab Dvalishvili and Cody Stamann is the latest addition to the UFC's Dec. 5 card.        Related StoriesMerab Dvalishvili vs. Cody Stamann joins UFC's Dec. 5 lineup - EnclosureUFC 253 breakdown: Who remains undefeated after Israel Adesanya and Paulo Costa's historic clash?MMA Junkie Radio #3090: UFC 253 preview, Reebok vs. Covington, Dana White, more 
usatoday.com
Unidentified corpse pulled out of Central Park lake
[nyp_brightcove playerid="6aIMRO3kiI" videoid="6194261320001" alignment="none" playlist_type="iris"][/nyp_brightcove]
nypost.com
Indonesia gives free Bali staycations to test tourism readiness
JAKARTA – Indonesia is offering free tours and staycations to 4,440 residents of its resort island of Bali, in a seven-week tourism dry-run to promote the international holiday hotspot and test its coronavirus health protocols. Authorities halted tourism in Indonesia’s prime attraction in April to prevent the spread of the virus, devastating its economy. Though...
nypost.com
New York City schools' remote opening is off to a bumpy, stressful start
New York City schools opened Monday with in-person classes for some students but remote learning for most -- and the first few days have been a bumpy ride for all.
edition.cnn.com
PlayStation 5 pre-orders: GameStop says it will offer more Friday
Retailer GameStop revealed on Twitter Thursday it will offer more pre-orders of Sony's PS5 on Friday, Sept. 25.        
usatoday.com
Man stabbed in Hell’s Kitchen bodega battle, cops say
The 43-year-old victim and another man were fighting around 11:40 p.m. inside the Stop 1 Food Market on 10th Avenue near West 51st Street.
nypost.com
Inside Hilary Duff’s LA home: Kid-proof furniture, crystals and a chicken coop
"We live in this house and we're hard on this house and I think that's what makes it feel like such a home."
nypost.com
Sanders says Trump is ready to undermine democracy to stay in power
The senator slammed the president's refusal to commit to a peaceful transfer of power and his opposition to mail-in voting.
cbsnews.com
Trump’s niece was ‘swindled’ by family out of full inheritance: suit
President Trump and his siblings, Maryanne and Robert, “swindled” niece Marry Trump out of tens of millions in inheritance money, new court papers allege. “Her aunt and uncles — who called Mary “honeybunch”— promised to watch over her interests for her benefit,” Mary’s Manhattan Supreme Court lawsuit from Thursday says. “Instead, they swindled her.” Mary...
nypost.com
Bernie Sanders says Trump threatens to undermine American democracy
In a speech Thursday, Senator Bernie Sanders warned that President Donald Trump "is prepared to undermine American democracy in order to stay in power." His comments came a day after the president refused to promise a peaceful transfer of power if he loses. Sanders said the 2020 election is a race "between Donald Trump and democracy, and democracy must win." Watch a portion of his remarks.
cbsnews.com
Low tide reveals WWII-era bomb on beach near resort town in UK
The World War II era explosive was found on a beach north of Weston-Super-Mare, a popular seaside vacation town in the Bristol Channel.        
usatoday.com
Thousands took to streets for Breonna Taylor protests in these major US cities
Tensions boiled over Wednesday at the news that none of the three officers involved in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor would be charged.
nypost.com
Jason Sudeikis Rocks The Carlton in This Exclusive ‘Ted Lasso’ Clip
Who knew Ted was such a Fresh Prince of Bel-Air fan?
nypost.com
Pelosi abruptly shifts course, restarts economic relief push amid signs economy is straining
washingtonpost.com
Watching cute animal videos does wonders for your stress levels, study says
It really is possible to "aww" the anxiety away, new research has found.
nypost.com
Coronavirus infected young adults more than other age groups over summer, CDC report says
Over the summer, the U.S. saw a shift in the age bracket most impacted by COVID-19.
foxnews.com
'My 600-lb. Life' star Coliesa McMillian dead at 41
Coliesa McMillian, known best for starring in "My 600-lb. Life," has died.
foxnews.com
Damon Harrison visiting Seahawks with eye on NFL return
After publicly considering retirement following last season, Damon ‘Snacks’ Harrison has decided to play this season and is set to visit the Seattle Seahawks next week, according to ESPN. The report also says that the former Jet and Giant has also received interest from the Chicago Bears, Green Bay Packers and Cincinnati Bengals. Harrison, a...
nypost.com
Don't be afraid of Bruce Springsteen's 'Ghosts,' they love to rock 'n' roll: The new song
"Ghosts" is the name of the new single from the upcoming Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band album, "Letter To You."        
usatoday.com
Louisville mayor: Violence is not the answer
As violence gripped Louisville following the decision in Breonna Taylor's case, Mayor Greg Fischer Thursday said "violence is not the answer." (Sept. 24)       
usatoday.com
David Paterson memoir reveals awkward moments amid Eliot Spitzer sex scandal
The book, "Black, Blind & in Charge," exposes the inside chaos of Spitzer's 2008 resignation.
nypost.com
Meghan Markle’s ‘AGT’ leather leggings exemplify her post-Megxit style
While the former "Suits" star lived in pants pre-royal wedding, she was reportedly discouraged from wearing them after becoming a member of the monarchy.
nypost.com
Rafael Nadal dragged into French Open COVID-19 ‘scandal’
Having been pushed back four months to September to escape the worst of the coronavirus, the French Open gets underway on Sunday still struggling to loosen the grip of the deadly pandemic. On Monday, the French Tennis Federation said that five players due to take part in men’s qualifying had been pulled out. Two had...
nypost.com
Michelle Obama on mail-in ballots: 'Don't listen to people who say...your vote will get lost'
Michelle Obama says Americans shouldn't "listen to people who say ... your vote will get lost."
foxnews.com
VIDEO: Fleeing Suspect's Vehicle Drags Utah Police Officer, Kills Driver
A man pulled over for a seatbelt violation fled the scene, dragging a Utah police officer with him before crashing head-on into a police vehicle, according to a recently released bodycam video from the Ogden Police Department.
breitbart.com
'Conenator': Who Is Amy Coney Barrett, Front-Runner For Supreme Court Nomination?
The 48-year-old judge, a possible replacement for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, is seen has having a proven conservative track record. Here are her views on faith, precedent, guns and more.
npr.org
Amazon is launching a cloud gaming service called Luna
The tech giant announced Thursday its cloud gaming service called Luna, which will be available on Fire TV and on mobile devices.        
usatoday.com
Why Arizona's Latino vote has Democrats in a tailspin
Democrats are worried 2020 presidential nominee Joe Biden's campaign isn't reaching Latino voters, and heavily populated "purple" states like Arizona could make all the difference come November. 
foxnews.com
How to cook with garlic powder
Garlic powder is more than just a background in spice blends. Learn how to use it in your everyday cooking.
latimes.com
The best garlic powder brands and how to use them
From brand to brand, garlic powder comes in different textures and colors; here's how to use each the best way.
latimes.com
Garlic-Crusted Cornbread
Garlic powder, dusted over the top, plays off the sweetness of cornmeal in this simple cornbread.
latimes.com
Firecrackers
Spiked with chile flakes, these salty snack crackers are a show-off for umami-packed garlic powder.
latimes.com
‘Thursday Night Football’ Live Stream: How To Watch The Dolphins Vs. Jaguars Live on NFL Network
The Dolphins and Jaguars meet on Thursday Night Football!
nypost.com
Garlic Fried Chicken
As essential as salt and pepper, here garlic powder highlights the umami sweetness of chicken in a simple, no-frills method.
latimes.com
French Media: Putin Told Macron Dissident Alexei Navalny May Have Poisoned Himself
France’s Le Monde reported this week that, during a telephone conversation with French President Emmanuel Macron on September 14, Russian President Vladimir Putin suggested opposition leader Alexei Navalny might have poisoned himself.
breitbart.com
For garlic powder, a working seasoning finally gets its turn in the spice limelight
A steady and reliable presence in the American pantry, garlic powder is finally getting the press it always deserved.
latimes.com