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Sen. Kelly Loeffler blasts players on her WNBA team for supporting challenger

WNBA players on the Atlanta Dream squad, which is co-owned by Sen. Kelly Loeffler, showed up to their Tuesday game wearing t-shirts promoting the Georgia lawmaker’s Democratic challenger. The statement against Loeffler, who is unpopular among many WNBA players for her opposition to the Black Lives Matter movement and the league’s affiliation with it, was...
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Lue koko artikkeli aiheesta: nypost.com
Google Accused of Not Fixing 'Illegal Advantage' Competition Problems
"Google is still in the mood that Microsoft once was, they think [they are] above the law," lawyer Thomas Höppner tells Newsweek.
newsweek.com
Kentucky lawmaker plans to introduce legislation to redefine 'rioting'
A Kentucky state lawmaker is planning to introduce legislation to refine "rioting" following the arrest of one of her colleagues last week amid several days of protests over the lack of criminal charges against police officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor. 
foxnews.com
Eagles Doug Pederson regrets OT punt, believes Carson Wentz could've made game winning play
Doug Pederson may be the only one in Philadelphia standing in Carson Wentz’s corner after the Eagles tied with the Cincinnati Bengals on Sunday. 
foxnews.com
Score a 10-pack of FDA-certified KN95 face masks for $25
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people wear face coverings while in public settings to help prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. A mask acts as a protective barrier between your respiratory droplets (caused by coughing, sneezing, talking, or raising your voice) and other people. Depending on...
nypost.com
Pelosi urges colleagues to prepare for 2020 presidential election reaching Congress
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., urged her congressional colleagues to redirect their fundraising efforts in an attempt to shore up the type of majority the party would need if the 2020 presidential election reached her chamber.
foxnews.com
10 celebrities that proved that you can be successful in music and in film
Vin Diesel finally released his debut single last week and the internet will never be the same. But he isn't the only celebrity who has seen success on-screen and on the charts.
edition.cnn.com
Trump's taxes tell a tale of debt and desperation
Ed McCaffery writes that the details of the new Times report paint a picture of a man using fairly standard tools of tax planning for the wealthy, but to lavish extremes.
edition.cnn.com
Opinion: Trump's taxes tell a tale of debt and desperation
The New York Times has broken a major story, based on access to decades of President Donald Trump's tax return data, just as they have in the past broken stories about the President's father, Fred Trump, and his aggressive tax planning, Donald Trump's billion-dollar tax losses in the late 80s and early 90s, and son-in-law Jared Kushner's years of apparent multimillion dollar federal tax avoidance. (A spokesman for Kushner's attorney has said that "Mr. Kushner properly filed and paid all taxes due under the law and regulations.")
edition.cnn.com
Here's how to get 4 months of Amazon Music Unlimited for just $1
Amazon Prime Day 2020 deals have already begun—Find out how to get four months of Amazon Music unlimited for just $1.       
usatoday.com
Amazon takes up to 35 percent off Cole Haan shoes for early Prime Day deal
Amazon’s annual Prime Day definitely doesn’t disappoint, with the two-day event officially being announced to run October 13 and October 14. During Prime Day, you’re sure to find markdowns on a variety of home, lifestyle and fashion goods. And if you’re looking for some statement kicks, then you’ll love its early Cole Haan deals. Known...
nypost.com
Chadwick Boseman took pay cut to boost co-star Sienna Miller’s salary
“That kind of thing just doesn't happen," Miller said.
nypost.com
Body cam footage shows Trump campaign aide Brad Parscale being tackled, detained by police
The video shows police tackle Parscale to the ground and place handcuffs on him.
foxnews.com
Eagles can’t ignore their Carson Wentz problem much longer
Week 3 of the NFL season was a wild one. We saw upsets, wild comebacks, even a near-walk off hook and ladder in the Chargers-Panthers game. It also gave us a fuller picture of what the NFL will look like. Six 3-0 teams remain – the Bills, Steelers, Packers, Seahawks, Bears and Titans – and...
nypost.com
Column: Humbug! A curmudgeon's view of Tuesday's presidential debate
The most likely scenario for the Trump-Biden debate is that these two septuagenarian men will simply confirm what everybody already thinks about them.
latimes.com
Drone flies human kidney 10 miles across Las Vegas desert
Special delivery! A drone flew a human kidney for more than 10 miles across the Las Vegas desert, marking the longest organ delivery flight via unmanned aircraft in the world, officials said. The historic flight happened on Sept. 17 and was one of two successful test drone runs carrying a human organ and tissue in...
nypost.com
The best sales to shop today: Amazon, Adidas, Perry Ellis and more
Today, you'll find deals on Amazon services ahead of Prime Day, discounts on Adidas and savings on plenty of clothes from Nordstrom Rack, Perry Ellis and Vineyard Vines. All that and more, below.
edition.cnn.com
The danger for Trump: Erosion among independents and those with college degrees
A review of Post-ABC polling in 2016 and 2020 shows where things have gotten worse for Trump.
washingtonpost.com
AT&T launches new mix-and-match unlimited family plans
The wireless company said Monday customers will have the flexibility to pick the Unlimited wireless plan that best fits each person in the family.       
usatoday.com
Police are looking for the suspect in a homicide at a popular haunted house
Detroit police are asking for the public's help in identifying a potential suspect in a homicide that occurred outside a popular haunted house.
edition.cnn.com
Earn 15 accredited certifications with this project management training
Whether you want to pivot industries, kickstart your career, or grow within your current organization, having a firm grasp of essential management tools is a great way to get your resume noticed. If this sounds like you, then you need to check out The Ultimate Six Sigma, Lean & Quality Management Bootcamp, which includes 18 courses...
nypost.com
Pennsylvania GOP lawmakers ask Supreme Court to stop voting accommodations
The state’s high court agreed with Democrats on leeway for counting mail-in ballots.
washingtonpost.com
Chiefs vs. Ravens line, prediction: Why Under is the smart bet
We get the matchup most think we will see again in the AFC Championship game when the 2-0 Kansas City Chiefs pay a visit to the 2-0 Baltimore Ravens on “ Monday Night Football.” These are the top two favorites to represent the AFC in Super Bowl LV. We also have a matchup of the...
nypost.com
'Cake Boss' star Buddy Valastro describes grizzly accident
The "Cake Boss" star and famous baker's hand was impaled while attempting to repair a machine at his in-home bowling alley.
edition.cnn.com
Jake Matthews wanted to say sorry to Diego Sanchez while punching him in the face
Jake Matthews wanted to say sorry to Diego Sanchez while punching him in the face        Related StoriesUFC on ESPN 16: Make your predictions for Holly Holm vs. Irene AldanaMatchup Roundup: New UFC and Bellator fights announced in the past week (Sept. 21-27)Danilo Marques' takedown game led to win in long-awaited return to action at UFC 253 
usatoday.com
Wide open spaces, no cases: This Oregon county has dodged COVID-19 completely
Wheeler County, located in north-central Oregon with rugged rim-rocked hills and canyons, is one of only six nationwide without a COVID-19 case.        
usatoday.com
Dan Brown’s publisher thrilled by ‘boring’ author’s cheating scandal
Bestselling author Dan Brown says his publisher was thrilled that he cheated on his wife — because readers thought he was too boring. “I called my publisher and said, ‘I’m so sorry, I hope this doesn’t impact sales,'” the “Da Vinci Code” author wrote in the Sunday Times of London about his ex-wife accusing him...
nypost.com
Man builds candy-shooting cannon, robot to keep trick-or-treating alive
This isn’t your father’s trick-or-treating. As the holiday draws closer, people across the country are still asking what Halloween will look like this year. Some areas have discussed canceling events like trick-or-treating, while it appears that others are looking to invent new ways to keep the tradition alive. Luke Keyes still plans on giving out...
nypost.com
Trump denies New York Times report on his taxes ahead of first presidential debate
President Trump is on the defensive after a New York Times article revealed information about his tax records that he has spent years concealing. The Times report comes ahead of the first presidential debate between Mr. Trump and Joe Biden. CBS News White House correspondent Paula Reid reports on what the newspaper found, and CBSN political reporter Caitlin Huey-Burns joined CBSN from Cleveland to discuss the upcoming debate.
cbsnews.com
Why this national park wants hunters to kill as many goats as possible
Federal and state organizations are up in arms over which modern warfare tactics should be deployed against a park's goat population.
nypost.com
Home Depot's giant Halloween skeleton sells out online: 'I love him'
Meet the Halloween hero you never knew you needed.
foxnews.com
Help! My Outraged Mother Won’t Talk About Anything Other Than Politics.
Of course, she isn’t doing anything to improve the situation, like volunteering or donating money.
slate.com
Tyler Posey Announces He's on OnlyFans With This Nude Serenade
"Welcome to my OnlyFans. I play guitar in my bare a**. Hang with me and we'll be best friends!" he sings while strumming on a guitar perched on a stool.
newsweek.com
Keto diet could be bad for your heart, researchers say
The findings of a new meta-analysis suggest that the keto diet could be bad for heart health. 
foxnews.com
Commentary: We need to talk about those Breonna Taylor T-shirts
Watching tennis champion Naomi Osaka's seven-part masktivism campaign during the U.S.
latimes.com
Three unattended kids injured in Bronx apartment fire
Three young children were injured Monday morning after a raging blaze broke out in their Bronx apartment building — where the 6-year-old, 3-year-old and 1-year-old girls had been left alone, cops said. Firefighters responded to the fire at 783 Burke Ave. around 9:30 a.m. and removed the three girls, who suffered smoke inhalation. They were...
nypost.com
Naya Rivera’s ex, Ryan Dorsey, moves in with her sister to help raise late actress’ son
Dorsey and Naya's sister, Nickayla, have moved into a three-bedroom to help care for Rivera and Dorsey's son Josey, 5.
nypost.com
Bill Richardson accused of covering up scheme to fund sexual services
Former New Mexico governor Bill Richardson has been accused in a newly unsealed lawsuit of covering up a pay-to-play scheme he allegedly used to fund “sexual services and sexual favors” while serving as his state’s top executive, a report said. In 2008, Richardson was accused in a suit of of running a kick-back scheme to...
nypost.com
Average parent’s knowledge of science and math taps out at this grade level
The average American parent’s science and math knowledge taps out around the sixth-grade level, according to new research. When asked to estimate the grade they’d be placed into for both math and science if they took a test today, the average respondent said sixth grade for each. The survey of 2,000 American parents of school-aged...
nypost.com
$20M settlement reached in police killing of handcuffed man
A Maryland county has agreed to a $20 million settlement with the family of a man who was handcuffed in a patrol car when a police officer shot and killed him, a county official said Monday.
foxnews.com
County awards $20 million to family of man who died after being handcuffed and shot in Maryland police car
Prince George's County, Maryland, has reached a settlement with the family of William Howard Green, who was handcuffed in a police cruiser when an officer allegedly fatally shot him, the county announced Monday.
edition.cnn.com
Oceans are out of balance — and that means stronger storms
Oceans store 1,000 more heat than the atmosphere and ultimately control our climate destiny.
cbsnews.com
Could the presidential race be decided by Nebraska’s second congressional district?
A new poll released Monday shows that Nebraska’s second congressional district could play a decisive role in the 2020 presidential election.
foxnews.com
Former Santa Margarita and USC lineman Max Tuerk died of enlarged heart, coroner says
Tuerk collapsed and died June 20, Father's Day weekend, while hiking on the Bell View trail in Los Pinos Peak in Orange County.
latimes.com
Fact-Checking Fargo: How Bad Was Anti-Italian Racism in the 1950s?
Prejudice against Italians had largely died out by the mid–20th century, but some were still discriminated against because of their Catholic faith.
slate.com
9 Manufacturers Poised to Take Advantage of California's Gas Car Ban
Tesla is at the top of this list, but traditional players like BMW, Toyota, Chevrolet, Kia, Volvo, Nissan, Chrysler and Honda also score high.
newsweek.com
The Most Complicated Vaccine Campaign in History
Editor’s Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here. On the day that a COVID-19 vaccine is approved, a vast logistics operation will need to awaken. Millions of doses must travel hundreds of miles from manufacturers to hospitals, doctor’s offices, and pharmacies, which in turn must store, track, and eventually get the vaccines to people all across the country. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with state and local health departments, coordinates this process. These agencies distributed flu vaccines during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic this way, and they manage childhood vaccines every day. But the COVID-19 vaccine will be a whole new challenge. “The COVID situation is significantly different and more complex than anything that we have had to deal with in the past,” says Kris Ehresmann, an infectious-disease director at the Minnesota Department of Health.The two leading vaccine candidates in the U.S.—one developed by Moderna, the other by a collaboration between Pfizer and the German company BioNTech—have progressed so quickly to clinical trials precisely because they are the fastest to make and manufacture. They rely on a novel vaccine technology whose advantage is speed, but whose downside is extreme physical fragility. These vaccines have to be frozen—in Pfizer/BioNTech’s case, at an ultracold –94 degrees Fahrenheit, colder than most freezers—which will limit how and where they can be shipped. The ways these vaccines are formulated (without added preservatives) and packaged (in vials that hold doses for multiple people) also make them easier to develop and manufacture quickly but harder to administer on the ground.In other words, speed is coming at the expense of convenience. “For this first generation of vaccines, we won’t trade off safety. We don’t want to trade off effectiveness,” says Kelly Moore, the associate director of immunization education at the Immunization Action Coalition. So instead, the U.S. is planning for a vaccine that requires brutally complicated logistics. Public-health departments in states, territories, and major cities are currently drawing up vaccine plans for the end of October. It’s still unclear whether these vaccines are safe and effective—and it’s extremely unlikely that data will be available by the end of October. But the departments are getting ready. Many are already stretched thin by the ongoing pandemic, and they are now helping plan, as Moore puts it, “the largest, most complex vaccination program ever attempted in history.”The leading vaccine candidates both deploy a new, long-promised technology. Their core is a piece of mRNA, genetic material that in this case encodes for the spike protein—the bit of the coronavirus that helps it enter human cells. The vaccine induces cells to take up the mRNA and make the spike protein and, hopefully, stimulates an immune response.By using mRNA, vaccine makers do not need to produce viral proteins or grow viruses, methods that are used in more traditional vaccines and that add time to the manufacturing process. This is why Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech have been able to get their vaccines into clinical trials so quickly. Moderna went from a genetic sequence of the coronavirus to the first shot in an arm in a record 63 days.To get a naked strand of mRNA inside a cell, scientists have learned to encase it in a package called a lipid nanoparticle. mRNA itself is an inherently unstable molecule, but it’s the lipid nanoparticles that are most sensitive to heat. If you get the vaccine cold enough, “there’s a temperature at which lipids and the lipid structure stop moving, essentially. And you have to be below that for it to be stable,” says Drew Weissman, who studies mRNA vaccines at the University of Pennsylvania and whose lab works with BioNTech. Keep the vaccine at too high a temperature for too long, and these lipid nanoparticles simply degrade. Moderna’s and Pfizer/BioNTech’s vaccines have to be shipped frozen at –4 degrees and –94 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively. Once thawed, Moderna’s vaccine can then last for 14 days at normal fridge temperatures; Pfizer’s, for five days.The freezer temperature required by Moderna’s vaccine makes it difficult to ship; the ultracold temperature required by Pfizer and BioNTech’s vaccine is nearly impossible to maintain outside of a large hospital or academic center with specialized freezers. For this reason, Pfizer has devised “thermal shippers” that, unopened, can keep the vaccines frozen for up to 10 days;once opened for the first time, they have to be replenished with dry ice within 24 hours then every five days. These shippers are supposed to be opened no more than twice a day to take out vials, and must be closed within one minute. The real catch, though, is that these shippers hold, at a minimum, 975 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine.A large hospital in a city could deal with that volume, but in rural areas, a 975-dose shipment will need to be broken up into smaller ones—all while making sure the vials stay ultracold. “The other potential would be only shipping that vaccine to our more urban areas,” says Molly Howell, North Dakota’s immunization program manager, “but then we’re leaving out a lot of people who are health-care workers in rural areas or at high risk in rural areas.” To get the vaccine out to those places, her department is looking into buying frozen-transport coolers and potentially a dry-ice machine. If North Dakota is allocated, for example, 2,000 doses, the state will have to open the thermal shipper, repackage smaller allotments in dry ice, and physically drive them to rural clinics across the state. The vaccines are too precious to risk shipping conventionally.The storage and handling requirements for these vaccines are especially stringent, but they’re also especially uncertain. In time, it may turn out that these mRNA vaccines can be stored at higher temperatures or can be reformulated to be stored at higher temperatures, as other vaccines have been. Scientists are actively trying to create more stable lipid nanoparticles, and Pfizer says it is working on a freeze-dried version of its vaccine that can be kept in normal freezers. These incremental improvements in storage are a normal part of the vaccine-development process, but they take time. For example, Kathleen Neuzil, a vaccine researcher at the University of Maryland, points out that the flu vaccine FluMist initially needed to be frozen but can now be stored at normal fridge temperatures. (Neuzil is also an investigator on the Pfizer/BioNTech-vaccine trial.) In the August CDC meeting where Pfizer unveiled the thermal shipper, a CDC official interjected to tell stakeholders not to go out and buy freezers in anticipation of a vaccine. The agency was exploring other storage solutions, and the requirements could change.And in fact, between that August meeting and the publication of the CDC’s vaccine-distribution playbook in September, the number of days Pfizer and BioNTech’s vaccine could be stored at fridge temperature increased from one to five. The vaccine is so new that even its manufacturer is still figuring out its minimum storage requirements.It sounds absurdly simple, but how the mRNA vaccines are packaged also imposes logistical challenges. Currently, they’re in multidose vials that have to be used or discarded within six hours of opening. Moderna’s vaccine comes in 10-dose vials; Pfizer and BioNTech’s, in five-dose vials. Unused doses can degrade over time at high temperatures and, more dangerous, can become contaminated with bacteria, because the vaccines lack preservatives. Both the multidose vials and the lack of preservatives help get a vaccine out faster, says Moore: Experts have been worrying about a shortage of glass for vaccine vials, and preservatives add complexity that can slow down vaccine development.Vaccine providers in the U.S. are unaccustomed to giving multidose, unpreserved vaccines, though. Administering them will require scheduling appointments with extra care in order to minimize waste, but also discarding unused doses if needed for safety. When multidose vaccines are used outside the U.S., according to Moore, who chairs a World Health Organization immunization committee, some waste is built into the vaccination program. “It’s okay to open a vial for one baby,” she says, because a program that doesn’t waste any doses is probably erring on the side of turning people away. But this mindset might seem counterintuitive, especially while COVID-19 vaccines remain scarce.Lastly, both Moderna’s and Pfizer/BioNTech’s vaccines require two doses per person over time, and the second dose has to come from the same manufacturer as the first dose. It also has to be administered exactly 28 days, for Moderna’s, or 21 days, for Pfizer and BioNTech’s, after the first dose—in both cases longer than the vaccines can be stored in the fridge. All of this means that having the right number of vaccines for the right people will require extensive and careful record keeping.Individual states maintain electronic immunization registries that track which residents have gotten which vaccines. What needs to be reported to the registries varies state by state; many vaccine providers, such as pharmacies and pediatrician’s offices, directly connect their records to the registry. But doctors who don’t routinely give vaccinations, such as those who see adults, might not be connected, which could mean manually inputting the data for every patient into the immunization registry. New connections to the system can also take weeks or months to establish, because of the complexity of electronic health records, Moore says.The CDC is rolling out a new Vaccine Administration Management System (VAMS) to supplement existing state registries, and it is expected to offer features such as scheduling and supply management. But VAMS has also added confusion, says Rebecca Coyle, the executive director of the American Immunization Registry Association. One issue is that VAMS requires collecting identifiable information that some states are not allowed to share from their existing immunization registries. If that’s not reconciled, vaccine providers might have to spend hours manually inputting patient data into the new system. “There’s a lot of clarification that still needs to happen,” Coyle says. “The clock has started with states to finalize their response plans, and yet there are giant chunks of information that are missing.”The two-dose requirement for these vaccines also runs up against the problem of human nature: People forget. They can’t get off work. They can’t find child care. They might even move. “That’s just normal human behavior outside of COVID,” says Azra Behlim, a senior director at the health-care-services firm Vizient. The CDC is planning to send physical vaccination-record cards for each patient along with vaccine supplies when states order their doses. It is also encouraging public-health departments and hospitals to send reminders about a second dose. This is important because even a full course of a vaccine may offer only partial protection against COVID-19, and one dose is likely to offer even less.If a vaccine is fast-tracked through an emergency use authorization rather than formally licensed by the Food and Drug Administration, that too could create bureaucratic hurdles. For example, Medicare doesn’t cover the costs of emergency-use drugs. So while the government intends to pay the cost of the vaccine and of supplies like syringes, hospitals would be on the hook for storage, scheduling, record keeping, and paying staff to actually give the injections. “Hospitals are not happy about that—at all,” Behlim says. A fix will likely have to come from Congress.Another worry for hospitals: having to juggle multiple vaccines that are not interchangeable, especially after more become available in the future. “What they’re concerned about is: I get a vaccine now in November, and then another manufacturer launches in January, and then another manufacturer in March, and three more launch in May,” Behlim says. Immunization registries can record who got which vaccine, but hospitals and clinics will still have to decide which ones to stock and how much of each. One vaccine might be more effective, but another one easier to store. A third might be most effective in older people, while a fourth could have the advantage of requiring only a single dose. The more vaccines there are on the market, the harder vaccine management becomes.In fact, with dozens of vaccines currently in clinical trials, the U.S. will very likely have multiple COVID-19 vaccines from multiple manufacturers next year. Two other vaccines are just behind Moderna’s and Pfizer/BioNTech’s mRNA vaccines, in Phase III clinical trials in the U.S. One of those is made by AstraZeneca and the other by Johnson & Johnson; both insert the genetic code for the coronavirus spike protein into a harmless virus.These vaccines take slightly longer to manufacture, because they require growing viruses, and they are also a relatively new technology. But they do not have to be frozen, and Johnson & Johnson’s can be given in just a single dose. Close behind these two are more traditional vaccines that use proteins purified from the virus, which will likely have traditional storage requirements. Of course, clinical trials still need to be completed before scientists will know whether any of these vaccines are safe and effective. “Which vaccine or vaccines will prove the safest and the most effective and the most deployable? I think we don’t know yet. And that’s why having redundancy is good,” says Dan Barouch, a vaccine researcher at Harvard. (His lab is a collaborator on Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine.)In the short run, speed is of the essence. But in the long run, these other characteristics—safety, effectiveness, and ease of use—will determine which vaccines get widely distributed. Julie Swann, who studies supply chains at North Carolina State University and who worked with the CDC during the 2009 flu pandemic, says she’s disappointed that the U.S. has put its weight behind these mRNA vaccines, which rely on new technology and whose handling imposes extra requirements on states and vaccine providers. It will be even harder to use them in developing countries. “There’s no way we can use this in some countries around the world,” she says.The good news is that more deployable vaccines are moving fast through the pipeline too. The race to a vaccine has dominated hopes for an end to the pandemic. But the first COVID-19 vaccine may not ultimately be the most important COVID-19 vaccine.
theatlantic.com
25 songs by Black women that rocked the music world, from the 1920s to 2020
Game changing pop, rock, jazz, blues and hip-hop recordings by Black women, from Bessie Smith to Cardi B.        
usatoday.com
Kentucky Derby winner Authentic draws nine spot, is favorite at Preakness Stakes
Kentucky Derby winner Authentic drew the nine spot for Saturday's Preakness Stakes. The Southern California-based colt was immediately named the 9-5 favorite.
latimes.com