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HHS Secretary Azar to be most senior US official to visit Taiwan

Health and Human Services Director Alex Azar will lead a delegation to Taiwan in the coming days in an effort to strengthen economic ties and mutual support during the coronavirus pandemic.
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Lue koko artikkeli aiheesta: foxnews.com
Commentary: We need to talk about those Breonna Taylor T-shirts
Watching tennis champion Naomi Osaka's seven-part masktivism campaign during the U.S.
latimes.com
$20M settlement reached in police killing of handcuffed man
A Maryland county has agreed to a $20 million settlement with the family of a man who was handcuffed in a patrol car when a police officer shot and killed him, a county official said Monday.
foxnews.com
County awards $20 million to family of man who died after being handcuffed and shot in Maryland police car
Prince George's County, Maryland, has reached a settlement with the family of William Howard Green, who was handcuffed in a police cruiser when an officer allegedly fatally shot him, the county announced Monday.
edition.cnn.com
Oceans are out of balance — and that means stronger storms
Oceans store 1,000 more heat than the atmosphere and ultimately control our climate destiny.
cbsnews.com
Could the presidential race be decided by Nebraska’s second congressional district?
A new poll released Monday shows that Nebraska’s second congressional district could play a decisive role in the 2020 presidential election.
foxnews.com
Former Santa Margarita and USC lineman Max Tuerk died of enlarged heart, coroner says
Tuerk collapsed and died June 20, Father's Day weekend, while hiking on the Bell View trail in Los Pinos Peak in Orange County.
latimes.com
Fact-Checking Fargo: How Bad Was Anti-Italian Racism in the 1950s?
Prejudice against Italians had largely died out by the mid–20th century, but some were still discriminated against because of their Catholic faith.
slate.com
9 Manufacturers Poised to Take Advantage of California's Gas Car Ban
Tesla is at the top of this list, but traditional players like BMW, Toyota, Chevrolet, Kia, Volvo, Nissan, Chrysler and Honda also score high.
newsweek.com
The Most Complicated Vaccine Campaign in History
Editor’s Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here. On the day that a COVID-19 vaccine is approved, a vast logistics operation will need to awaken. Millions of doses must travel hundreds of miles from manufacturers to hospitals, doctor’s offices, and pharmacies, which in turn must store, track, and eventually get the vaccines to people all across the country. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with state and local health departments, coordinates this process. These agencies distributed flu vaccines during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic this way, and they manage childhood vaccines every day. But the COVID-19 vaccine will be a whole new challenge. “The COVID situation is significantly different and more complex than anything that we have had to deal with in the past,” says Kris Ehresmann, an infectious-disease director at the Minnesota Department of Health.The two leading vaccine candidates in the U.S.—one developed by Moderna, the other by a collaboration between Pfizer and the German company BioNTech—have progressed so quickly to clinical trials precisely because they are the fastest to make and manufacture. They rely on a novel vaccine technology whose advantage is speed, but whose downside is extreme physical fragility. These vaccines have to be frozen—in Pfizer/BioNTech’s case, at an ultracold –94 degrees Fahrenheit, colder than most freezers—which will limit how and where they can be shipped. The ways these vaccines are formulated (without added preservatives) and packaged (in vials that hold doses for multiple people) also make them easier to develop and manufacture quickly but harder to administer on the ground.In other words, speed is coming at the expense of convenience. “For this first generation of vaccines, we won’t trade off safety. We don’t want to trade off effectiveness,” says Kelly Moore, the associate director of immunization education at the Immunization Action Coalition. So instead, the U.S. is planning for a vaccine that requires brutally complicated logistics. Public-health departments in states, territories, and major cities are currently drawing up vaccine plans for the end of October. It’s still unclear whether these vaccines are safe and effective—and it’s extremely unlikely that data will be available by the end of October. But the departments are getting ready. Many are already stretched thin by the ongoing pandemic, and they are now helping plan, as Moore puts it, “the largest, most complex vaccination program ever attempted in history.”The leading vaccine candidates both deploy a new, long-promised technology. Their core is a piece of mRNA, genetic material that in this case encodes for the spike protein—the bit of the coronavirus that helps it enter human cells. The vaccine induces cells to take up the mRNA and make the spike protein and, hopefully, stimulates an immune response.By using mRNA, vaccine makers do not need to produce viral proteins or grow viruses, methods that are used in more traditional vaccines and that add time to the manufacturing process. This is why Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech have been able to get their vaccines into clinical trials so quickly. Moderna went from a genetic sequence of the coronavirus to the first shot in an arm in a record 63 days.To get a naked strand of mRNA inside a cell, scientists have learned to encase it in a package called a lipid nanoparticle. mRNA itself is an inherently unstable molecule, but it’s the lipid nanoparticles that are most sensitive to heat. If you get the vaccine cold enough, “there’s a temperature at which lipids and the lipid structure stop moving, essentially. And you have to be below that for it to be stable,” says Drew Weissman, who studies mRNA vaccines at the University of Pennsylvania and whose lab works with BioNTech. Keep the vaccine at too high a temperature for too long, and these lipid nanoparticles simply degrade. Moderna’s and Pfizer/BioNTech’s vaccines have to be shipped frozen at –4 degrees and –94 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively. Once thawed, Moderna’s vaccine can then last for 14 days at normal fridge temperatures; Pfizer’s, for five days.The freezer temperature required by Moderna’s vaccine makes it difficult to ship; the ultracold temperature required by Pfizer and BioNTech’s vaccine is nearly impossible to maintain outside of a large hospital or academic center with specialized freezers. For this reason, Pfizer has devised “thermal shippers” that, unopened, can keep the vaccines frozen for up to 10 days;once opened for the first time, they have to be replenished with dry ice within 24 hours then every five days. These shippers are supposed to be opened no more than twice a day to take out vials, and must be closed within one minute. The real catch, though, is that these shippers hold, at a minimum, 975 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine.A large hospital in a city could deal with that volume, but in rural areas, a 975-dose shipment will need to be broken up into smaller ones—all while making sure the vials stay ultracold. “The other potential would be only shipping that vaccine to our more urban areas,” says Molly Howell, North Dakota’s immunization program manager, “but then we’re leaving out a lot of people who are health-care workers in rural areas or at high risk in rural areas.” To get the vaccine out to those places, her department is looking into buying frozen-transport coolers and potentially a dry-ice machine. If North Dakota is allocated, for example, 2,000 doses, the state will have to open the thermal shipper, repackage smaller allotments in dry ice, and physically drive them to rural clinics across the state. The vaccines are too precious to risk shipping conventionally.The storage and handling requirements for these vaccines are especially stringent, but they’re also especially uncertain. In time, it may turn out that these mRNA vaccines can be stored at higher temperatures or can be reformulated to be stored at higher temperatures, as other vaccines have been. Scientists are actively trying to create more stable lipid nanoparticles, and Pfizer says it is working on a freeze-dried version of its vaccine that can be kept in normal freezers. These incremental improvements in storage are a normal part of the vaccine-development process, but they take time. For example, Kathleen Neuzil, a vaccine researcher at the University of Maryland, points out that the flu vaccine FluMist initially needed to be frozen but can now be stored at normal fridge temperatures. (Neuzil is also an investigator on the Pfizer/BioNTech-vaccine trial.) In the August CDC meeting where Pfizer unveiled the thermal shipper, a CDC official interjected to tell stakeholders not to go out and buy freezers in anticipation of a vaccine. The agency was exploring other storage solutions, and the requirements could change.And in fact, between that August meeting and the publication of the CDC’s vaccine-distribution playbook in September, the number of days Pfizer and BioNTech’s vaccine could be stored at fridge temperature increased from one to five. The vaccine is so new that even its manufacturer is still figuring out its minimum storage requirements.It sounds absurdly simple, but how the mRNA vaccines are packaged also imposes logistical challenges. Currently, they’re in multidose vials that have to be used or discarded within six hours of opening. Moderna’s vaccine comes in 10-dose vials; Pfizer and BioNTech’s, in five-dose vials. Unused doses can degrade over time at high temperatures and, more dangerous, can become contaminated with bacteria, because the vaccines lack preservatives. Both the multidose vials and the lack of preservatives help get a vaccine out faster, says Moore: Experts have been worrying about a shortage of glass for vaccine vials, and preservatives add complexity that can slow down vaccine development.Vaccine providers in the U.S. are unaccustomed to giving multidose, unpreserved vaccines, though. Administering them will require scheduling appointments with extra care in order to minimize waste, but also discarding unused doses if needed for safety. When multidose vaccines are used outside the U.S., according to Moore, who chairs a World Health Organization immunization committee, some waste is built into the vaccination program. “It’s okay to open a vial for one baby,” she says, because a program that doesn’t waste any doses is probably erring on the side of turning people away. But this mindset might seem counterintuitive, especially while COVID-19 vaccines remain scarce.Lastly, both Moderna’s and Pfizer/BioNTech’s vaccines require two doses per person over time, and the second dose has to come from the same manufacturer as the first dose. It also has to be administered exactly 28 days, for Moderna’s, or 21 days, for Pfizer and BioNTech’s, after the first dose—in both cases longer than the vaccines can be stored in the fridge. All of this means that having the right number of vaccines for the right people will require extensive and careful record keeping.Individual states maintain electronic immunization registries that track which residents have gotten which vaccines. What needs to be reported to the registries varies state by state; many vaccine providers, such as pharmacies and pediatrician’s offices, directly connect their records to the registry. But doctors who don’t routinely give vaccinations, such as those who see adults, might not be connected, which could mean manually inputting the data for every patient into the immunization registry. New connections to the system can also take weeks or months to establish, because of the complexity of electronic health records, Moore says.The CDC is rolling out a new Vaccine Administration Management System (VAMS) to supplement existing state registries, and it is expected to offer features such as scheduling and supply management. But VAMS has also added confusion, says Rebecca Coyle, the executive director of the American Immunization Registry Association. One issue is that VAMS requires collecting identifiable information that some states are not allowed to share from their existing immunization registries. If that’s not reconciled, vaccine providers might have to spend hours manually inputting patient data into the new system. “There’s a lot of clarification that still needs to happen,” Coyle says. “The clock has started with states to finalize their response plans, and yet there are giant chunks of information that are missing.”The two-dose requirement for these vaccines also runs up against the problem of human nature: People forget. They can’t get off work. They can’t find child care. They might even move. “That’s just normal human behavior outside of COVID,” says Azra Behlim, a senior director at the health-care-services firm Vizient. The CDC is planning to send physical vaccination-record cards for each patient along with vaccine supplies when states order their doses. It is also encouraging public-health departments and hospitals to send reminders about a second dose. This is important because even a full course of a vaccine may offer only partial protection against COVID-19, and one dose is likely to offer even less.If a vaccine is fast-tracked through an emergency use authorization rather than formally licensed by the Food and Drug Administration, that too could create bureaucratic hurdles. For example, Medicare doesn’t cover the costs of emergency-use drugs. So while the government intends to pay the cost of the vaccine and of supplies like syringes, hospitals would be on the hook for storage, scheduling, record keeping, and paying staff to actually give the injections. “Hospitals are not happy about that—at all,” Behlim says. A fix will likely have to come from Congress.Another worry for hospitals: having to juggle multiple vaccines that are not interchangeable, especially after more become available in the future. “What they’re concerned about is: I get a vaccine now in November, and then another manufacturer launches in January, and then another manufacturer in March, and three more launch in May,” Behlim says. Immunization registries can record who got which vaccine, but hospitals and clinics will still have to decide which ones to stock and how much of each. One vaccine might be more effective, but another one easier to store. A third might be most effective in older people, while a fourth could have the advantage of requiring only a single dose. The more vaccines there are on the market, the harder vaccine management becomes.In fact, with dozens of vaccines currently in clinical trials, the U.S. will very likely have multiple COVID-19 vaccines from multiple manufacturers next year. Two other vaccines are just behind Moderna’s and Pfizer/BioNTech’s mRNA vaccines, in Phase III clinical trials in the U.S. One of those is made by AstraZeneca and the other by Johnson & Johnson; both insert the genetic code for the coronavirus spike protein into a harmless virus.These vaccines take slightly longer to manufacture, because they require growing viruses, and they are also a relatively new technology. But they do not have to be frozen, and Johnson & Johnson’s can be given in just a single dose. Close behind these two are more traditional vaccines that use proteins purified from the virus, which will likely have traditional storage requirements. Of course, clinical trials still need to be completed before scientists will know whether any of these vaccines are safe and effective. “Which vaccine or vaccines will prove the safest and the most effective and the most deployable? I think we don’t know yet. And that’s why having redundancy is good,” says Dan Barouch, a vaccine researcher at Harvard. (His lab is a collaborator on Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine.)In the short run, speed is of the essence. But in the long run, these other characteristics—safety, effectiveness, and ease of use—will determine which vaccines get widely distributed. Julie Swann, who studies supply chains at North Carolina State University and who worked with the CDC during the 2009 flu pandemic, says she’s disappointed that the U.S. has put its weight behind these mRNA vaccines, which rely on new technology and whose handling imposes extra requirements on states and vaccine providers. It will be even harder to use them in developing countries. “There’s no way we can use this in some countries around the world,” she says.The good news is that more deployable vaccines are moving fast through the pipeline too. The race to a vaccine has dominated hopes for an end to the pandemic. But the first COVID-19 vaccine may not ultimately be the most important COVID-19 vaccine.
theatlantic.com
25 songs by Black women that rocked the music world, from the 1920s to 2020
Game changing pop, rock, jazz, blues and hip-hop recordings by Black women, from Bessie Smith to Cardi B.        
usatoday.com
Kentucky Derby winner Authentic draws nine spot, is favorite at Preakness Stakes
Kentucky Derby winner Authentic drew the nine spot for Saturday's Preakness Stakes. The Southern California-based colt was immediately named the 9-5 favorite.
latimes.com
Dozens of California wineries under threat from latest wildfire
California’s latest wildfire destroyed a historic family-run winery — and was threatening dozens more Monday as it spread across the famed Napa-Sonoma wine region. The Chateau Boswell Winery was photographed completely engulfed by the Glass Fire, which started in Napa Valley early Sunday — and spread to cover 11,000 acres within a day, with thousands...
nypost.com
You've been Karbombz'd! Kenny Scharf rolls his art down Santa Monica Boulevard
The L.A. artist, who has painted 260 cars with his madcap cartoons, brings some levity to dark days with a Karbombz! rally.
latimes.com
Who are the Proud Boys? CNN goes inside a rally
CNN's Elle Reeve spent time with the Proud Boys, a far-right group, during a rally in Portland, Oregon. Hear what they have to say about their beliefs and reputation of being violent.
edition.cnn.com
Sophia Hutchins and Caitlyn Jenner in talks to join ‘RHOBH’
Kris Jenner is out, but that doesn't mean the Kardashians won't be coming to Bravo.
nypost.com
Amy Coney Barrett's Nomination Opposed by Fewer Than One-Third of Voters: Poll
Despite polls showing a majority of Americans oppose Trump filling the vacant Supreme Court seat before the election, voters are much less inclined to oppose Barrett specifically.
newsweek.com
New research says liquid water might exist on Mars
Martians may exist — and be living on lakefront property. New research shows that the Red Planet may actually have liquid water in salty lakes under its polar ice cap — thus giving a place for life to develop, according to a report. The bodies of water, if confirmed, would be similar to the subglacial...
nypost.com
Kiefer Crosbie guns to finish Charlie Leary at Bellator Europe 9, then wants Myles Jury
Kiefer Crosbie wants to make a statement vs. Charlie Leary on Oct. 3 then plans on calling out a UFC veteran.        Related StoriesKiefer Crosbie guns to finish Charlie Leary at Bellator Europe 9, then wants Myles Jury - EnclosureUFC books Jason Witt vs. Cole Williams for Oct. 31 event in Las VegasUFC books Jason Witt vs. Cole Williams for Oct. 31 event in Las Vegas - Enclosure 
usatoday.com
Alarming Data Shows a Third Wave of COVID-19 Is About to Hit the U.S.
America's battle with COVID-19 is not even close to finished
time.com
Family of handcuffed man shot dead by cop awarded $20 million
The settlement reflects the "heinous nature, the brutal nature, the senseless nature" of William Green's killing, lawyer says.
cbsnews.com
Blood test may reveal coronavirus severity, death risk: study
A recent study suggests a standard component of routine blood tests may serve as a useful predictor of COVID-19 severity and risk of mortality. 
foxnews.com
Giants’ MLB playoff hopes crushed on umpire’s brutal call
The San Francisco Giants fell just short of qualifying for the expanded National League playoffs. The way in which their 2020 season ended was all the more disappointing. Home plate umpire Rob Drake rung up Austin Slater with a questionable third-strike call to secure the Giants’ fate with a 5-4 loss to the San Diego...
nypost.com
Amanda Seyfried secretly gave birth to her second child, a baby boy
They didn't reveal his name.
nypost.com
Yankees take on Indians in postseason and will have to contend with midges again
The New York Yankees will not only have to deal with the upstart Cleveland Indians in the American League Wild Card Series but they will face off again against an old foe – midges.
foxnews.com
What role could Trump's Supreme Court nominee play in upcoming cases if she's confirmed?
President Trump's nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to fill the seat of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is sparking conversations about what Barrett's potential confirmation could mean for cases involving certain issues. Ilya Shapiro, director of the Robert A. Levy Center for Constitutional Studies at the Cato Institute, joined CBSN to discuss.
cbsnews.com
Dax Shepard surprised by support follow drug relapse revelation
“[I’m] struggling with some fraudulent feelings of receiving love based on a f—k up."
nypost.com
Coronavirus updates: Global death toll nears 1M; New York sees rise in cases; 1 in 3 parents won't vaccinate kids against flu
Global death toll nears 1 million. Public health officials fear seasonal flu will complicate the coronavirus pandemic. Latest COVID-19 news.        
usatoday.com
Cardi B files ‘WAP’ trademark for clothing, jewelry, bags and shoes
Get ready to look certified chic, seven days a week.
nypost.com
Teacher in France says tattoos cost him kindergarten teaching job
PALAISEAU, France – A schoolteacher whose body, face and tongue are covered in tattoos and who has had the whites of his eyes surgically turned black said he was prevented from teaching at a French kindergarten after a parent complained he scared their child. But the teacher, Sylvain Helaine, 35, still teaches children from the...
nypost.com
Texas Sheriff Indicted for Allegedly Destroying Video of Black Man's Death in Police Custody
Javier Ambler, 40, died on March 28, 2019, after being restrained by police and shot by a stun gun.
newsweek.com
Boy's death led to detection of brain-eating amoeba in water
After Josiah McIntyre's death, heath officials conducted water sample tests and detected the brain-eating amoeba.
cbsnews.com
Sex after heart attack may boost survival, study claims
Those who maintained or increased sexual activity during the first six months of recovery were found to have a 35% lower risk of death compared to those who abstained.
foxnews.com
New measurements show moon has hazardous radiation levels
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Future moon explorers will be bombarded with two to three times more radiation than astronauts aboard the International Space Station, a health hazard that will require thick-walled shelters for protection, scientists reported Friday. China’s lander on the far side of the moon is providing the first full measurements of radiation exposure...
nypost.com
Some students will be able to return to D.C. public school buildings this week
Mayor says that a decision is coming soon on returning all students to classrooms in November.
washingtonpost.com
Listen to Episode 31 of ‘Pinstripe Pod’: Yankees-Indians Playoff Preview feat. George King
The Yankees will begin their push for a 28th championship on Tuesday when they begin their best-of-three game series in Cleveland against the Indians. To break down the opening playoff series, we bring you a brand new episode of the “Pinstripe Pod” with Chris Shearn and four-time World Series champion Jeff Nelson. The guys open...
nypost.com
Trump Tweet Criticizing Americans for Not Paying Taxes, Despite 'Crippling' Government Debt, Resurfaces
A tweet originally shared on social media in 2012 is circulating again after the New York Times' report on the president's income tax history.
newsweek.com
Biden fact-checking Trump at presidential debate could be a mistake, Rove says
Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden could be making a strategic mistake if he attempts to act as “fact-checker” of President Trump’s positions in the upcoming debate, said Fox News contributor Karl Rove on Monday.
foxnews.com
Analysis: How Fox News' so-called 'straight news' division spins negative news for Trump
The New York Times' explosive report on President Trump's taxes was, for most news outlets, a serious story worth significant coverage. For Fox News, it was an example of how the network works to protect Trump while trying to maintain its veneer as a news outlet.
edition.cnn.com
South Dakota AG called 'a coward' after allegedly striking, killing local man with car
The cousin of a South Dakota man who was fatally struck by a car driven by the state attorney general slammed the official as a “coward” as he revealed new details about the tragic night and the events that followed.
foxnews.com
John Oliver Says the Supreme Court Fight Is Already Lost—but Others Are Just Beginning
The Last Week Tonight host acknowledged Amy Coney Barrett’s likely confirmation is “going to hurt for a long time.”
slate.com
Brad Parscale was drunk, had loaded gun when Florida police arrived at home
Brad Parscale was drunk when cops showed up at his Florida home for a suicide-prevention call — where the former Trump campaign manager’s wife told police he hit her and had loaded a gun during a heated argument, according to news reports. Parscale — who works remotely from Florida as the campaign’s digital director, barricaded...
nypost.com
'Cake Boss' Buddy Valastro describes his bloody hand injury: 'It just blew out half of my hand'
Buddy "Cake Boss" Valastro described on "Today" how an accident at his bowling alley left him severely injured. "It just blew out half of my hand."       
usatoday.com
On his 36th birthday, Ryan Zimmerman considers what he’ll be doing on his 37th
After spending a baseball season watching, will the Washington Nationals' cornerstone get to spend another playing?
washingtonpost.com
Patriots play for James White
What I'm Hearing: Patriots bring their game to the next level to show support for James White whose father passed        
usatoday.com
If Democrats win, they should move quickly to help the Postal Service
Americans don't think their beloved USPS should be run like a business. So it needs some long-overdue reform.
washingtonpost.com
Pierce Brosnan seeks $100 million for dramatic Malibu compound
'James Bond' actor Pierce Brosnan is asking $100 million for his dramatic Thai-inspired retreat on Malibu's Broad Beach.
latimes.com
Giants, Daniel Jones ruined two $500,000 bets
It was another wild weekend of wagering in the NFL, as sportsbooks bounced back from a rough Week 2. The biggest bets of Sunday came at DraftKings Sportsbook in New Jersey, as the book took two huge wagers on the New York Giants: * $500,000 on the Giants +4 * $500,000 on Daniel Jones Over...
nypost.com
Washington Monument to reopen to public October 1
The Washington Monument was shuttered for years after an earthquake, only to reopen shortly before COVID-19 struck, causing it to close again.
cbsnews.com