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Cyclone Isaias moves into Canada after killing 5 on US east coast

Isaias, now a post-tropical cyclone, has moved into southeastern Canada, bringing heavy rain and powerful winds over the province of Quebec.
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Joe Biden’s plan to beat the coronavirus
Joe Biden’s plan to beat the Covid-19 pandemic is founded on a simple premise: leadership matters. | Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images Donald Trump botched America’s Covid-19 response. Joe Biden thinks he has a plan to fix it. Joe Biden’s plan to beat back the Covid-19 pandemic in the United States is founded on a simple premise: leadership matters. President Donald Trump has badly botched the response thus far, according to most experts, and the numbers tell the tale: 200,000 Americans are dead. He’s tried to discredit the scientific institutions tasked with managing the response. Millions of people are still out of work. Thousands of businesses have closed that will never reopen. Biden’s campaign has spent the last six months coming up with its plan to fix it. “What worries me now is we’ve been living with this pandemic for so long, we’re at risk of becoming numb to the toll it’s taken on us and our country,” Biden said last week. “There are 200,000 moms and dads, sons and daughters, grandmothers and grandfathers, aunts and uncles, friends and coworkers who are no longer with us. And so many of them didn’t have to lose their lives to this virus if only the president had acted sooner.” If he’s elected president, Biden sees his role as, fundamentally, removing the obstacles set up by the Trump administration that hindered an effective Covid-19 response. The Trump White House has pressured states to reopen before they contained their outbreaks; Biden would encourage mask mandates and, if necessary, new lockdowns. The president has undermined the government’s top scientists; Biden is promising he will empower them. Congress has failedto appropriate any new funding for Covid-19 response since the spring; Biden and congressional Democrats want to make major new investments. Biden believes the public needs to hear a new message from the government, one founded in good science. His top adviser and presumed chief-of-staff in waiting is Ron Klain, who oversaw the Obama administration’s Ebola response. He has convened an informal panel of experts, who have briefed him regularly on the state of the US outbreak and on the best strategies for containing it. Taken together, the campaign is working toward what public health experts say is the most effective strategy for containing Covid-19: a test-trace-isolate program, making mask-wearing and social distancing mandatory, and, once the science supports it, an equitably distributed vaccine. Totally suppressing Covid-19 to the same level that South Korea or New Zealand have is likely a lost cause at this point. But the Biden campaign believes it can flatten cases and deaths until a vaccine is widely available, potentially saving thousands of lives in the process. The Biden plan faces enormous challenges. As Vox reported at the beginning of the pandemic, local officials are largely tasked with executing these public safety measures, and it’s entirely possible Republican governors aren’t going to want to go along with Biden’s way of doing things. It could be difficult to restore public trust in the scientific process. And equitably distributing a scientifically sound vaccine to the general population is something the candidate himself has compared to a large-scale military operation. Still, Biden says he is up for the challenge. “We can, as we have so many times in our history, begin anew,” Biden said this week. “We can get control of this virus.” Step 1: Fix America’s test-trace-isolate problem America has never had a cohesive Covid-19 testing strategy. Since February, there have been regular supply shortages delaying test results. States have been fighting each other for precious resources. Contact tracing has not been a priority for the federal government, and most states have still not hired nearly enough people to perform that work. Without an effective test-trace-isolate program, the US has never had a realistic chance of stamping out the virus. After talking with some of Biden’s Covid-19 advisers, it’s clear that his first priority as president would be to use the tools at the federal government’s disposal to improve US testing. The goal is more testing and faster testing that then allows for better contact tracing to identify which people need to be isolated, all in order to slow down Covid-19’s spread. William Campbell/Getty Images The core of Joe Biden’s Covid-19 response plan is ramping up and better coordinating testing across the United States. Biden wants to set up a pandemic testing board to oversee the allocation of testing materials around the country. That could help the kind of testing bottlenecks the US has periodically experienced throughout the year; tests in Florida during its summer spike were taking a week or more to come back, making them effectively useless for contact tracing and isolating, while people in a state like Connecticut, where cases had actually fallen off, could get results in a day or two. The Trump administration has explicitly tried to limit testing to symptomatic individuals only, after the president has said both privately and publicly he wants less testing because more testing means more cases are identified. The FDA currently has a restriction in place that limits rapid-results antigen tests to symptomatic individuals, when the expert consensus says those tests should actually be used to screen asymptomatic people. Because people with Covid-19 can spread the virus before they show symptoms, that broader community-based testing would help identify infectious individuals early so they can isolate and avoid spreading it to others. A Biden-led Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would likely issue new federal guidelines on Covid-19 testing, encouraging more testing of asymptomatic individuals and front-line workers as well as in nursing homes. “I had thought for the first several months, this was an allocation problem, getting the tests where they need to be,” David Kessler, the former FDA chief who is advising the Biden campaign on Covid-19, told me. “But there is this artificial impediment to testing, by setting up this restrictive criteria.” High-level coordination conducted by a centralized testing board, as Biden is proposing, would also be important for equitably distributing those new antigen tests, a process that will likely take months. Right now, NBA and NFL players can get tested all the time because their leagues can afford to buy the available antigen tests. But essential workers might not have the same opportunity. That’s the kind of disparity a Biden administration would want to try to fix as tens of millions of antigen tests are shipped around the country in the coming months. “This is turning into an equity problem, a world of haves and have-nots,” said Thomas Tsai, a Harvard health policy professor who has worked on testing issues. Testing ultimately matters only if sick people isolate themselves and public health workers can contact the people they may have exposed so they can isolate, too. Most US states have also still not hired enough contact tracing workers. Biden has said he wants to establish a new US public health job corps that would perform that contact tracing work, with federal money to hire at least 100,000 people and train them, a plan that would likely require new funding from Congress. Polls have shown a lack of public comfort with smartphone contact tracing apps, and public health workers have anecdotally reported encountering skepticism from people they’ve interviewed, who are wary of sharing personal information with the government. Biden campaign advisers believe federal leadership that encourages trust could lead to more buy-in from the public for these public health efforts, though it will likely remain a challenge given the deep political polarization in the US. The pandemic is not going to end without an adequate test-trace-isolate program; anything else, including eventual vaccine distribution, depends first on slowing Covid-19’s spread. Step 2: Provide people, businesses, and states with more economic relief Trump has presented the pandemic and the economic crisis as fundamentally at odds, saying the US cannot let the cure (lockdowns) be worse than the disease (Covid-19). But public health experts say the two are inevitably linked. The only way to fully restore the economy is to get the virus under control; people aren’t going to resume their normal lives if they are worried about getting sick at a restaurant or a store. Noam Galai/Getty Images The Biden campaign and Democrats in Congress are planning another round of economic relief as millions remain out of work and businesses close. Still, the economic pain is real, and that pain puts pressure on government leaders to allow some business activities to resume lest jobs and businesses be permanently lost. One way to alleviate that pressure and allow more time for better public health interventions to start suppressing Covid-19’s spread is to provide more economic relief. The US economy has regained some of the jobs lost since March, but millions are still out of work. It’s clear by now that the V-shaped recovery hyped by the Trump administration is not going to happen. The unemployment and business relief provisions Congress passed earlier in the year have started to expire, and nobody in Washington seems optimistic that any new deal on extending that assistance will be reached by the end of the year. Biden could take administrative actions that would provide Americans with some economic relief. But the most powerful tools will need to be approved by Congress — and the difference between President Biden negotiating with a Congress fully controlled by Democrats versus a Congress split between a Democratic House and a Republican Senate is substantial. Democrats in Congress say their first order of business would be a new Covid-19 relief and response package. It would likely incorporate the necessary funding to improve testing and tracing, according to Senate Democratic aides, as well as specifications about how federal money should be spent. It would also be expected to include economic provisions. Increased unemployment aid and new funding for state and local governments would be a given, based on the legislation already passed by House Democrats and interviews with aides. Democrats will likely want to extend the now-expired $600 additional unemployment benefit. Congress could also add funding specifically for state Medicaid programs, which have had enrollment swellduring the economic downturn, aides say. Democrats will have to decide whether their first big bill will focus narrowly on Covid-19 or whether to include bigger permanent reforms. On health care, they could either stick with more incremental improvements, such as covering treatment for the people with long-term Covid-19 complications, or go bigger by enhancing the Obamacare tax subsidies and even possibly establishing the public health insurance option Biden says he supports. Senior Democrats acknowledge there will be enormous pressure from the more progressive members to go big. Nobody is ruling anything out, but as one health policy expert put it recently: “First, you have to stop the bleeding.” Step 3: Fast and equitable use of an effective Covid-19 vaccine More economic relief should lower the pressure on states and businesses to reopen, while more testing and tracing should help reduce Covid-19’s spread. But to actually put an end to the pandemic, we will need a vaccine. And for all Trump’s antics around a Covid-19 vaccine, the bottom line is that an effective vaccine does seem likely to be developed in record time. Several candidates are already in phase 3 trials, and there is hope that within a matter of months, one or more will be approved. Then comes the hard part, which is distributing the vaccine to people. That mission will require a tremendous amount of coordination: producing the doses, shipping them around the country, figuring out which populations will be prioritized, setting up vaccination sites, and getting the message out to the public about how to get their vaccine. “Distributing a vaccine to the entire population is as complex and challenging as the most sensitive military operation,” Biden said in remarks earlier this month. Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images With clinical trials underway, there is optimism about a Covid-19 vaccine. But distributing it to 330 million Americans will be a challenge. He promised to develop a more detailed plan for vaccine distribution before assuming office, but he did lay out what that plan would cover: a detailed timeline for when people would get the vaccine a clear delineation of which populations would be prioritized the specific means for shipping and storing the vaccines at appropriate temperatures which government agencies would be responsible for implementing that plan The Trump administration, through its Operation Warp Speed, already placed orders for some of the most promising vaccine candidates and it has paid drug companies to start manufacturing doses even before they know whether the vaccine will be viable. It also, somewhat controversially, asked state and local health departments to develop distribution plans so they’d be ready to start vaccinating people as soon as October. Some saw that as an example of Trump applying government pressure to get a vaccine sent out before the election. Practically speaking, however, that directive should still encourage health agencies to make preparations before Biden takes office. They won’t be starting from scratch. Rather, Biden’s leadership role will be just as critical as his operational responsibilities. Public trust in an eventual Covid-19 vaccine is not very high right now, polls show, and it has been deteriorating over the last few months. If too few people take a vaccine because they don’t trust it, then it’s going to be harder to completely stamp out the virus. So Biden will have a public health imperative to strengthen the American public’s faith in a vaccine. He has had to equivocate during the campaign, emphasizing that while he doesn’t trust Trump himself, he does trust vaccines and scientists as a rule. “I trust vaccines. I trust the scientists,” he said recently. “But I don’t trust Donald Trump — and the American people can’t either. If Biden is the president, then he can empower those scientists and even make them the face of a vaccine push. But even under the most optimistic scenarios, vaccinating some 60 percent of Americans will take months. Dr. Anthony Fauci, one of the government scientists Biden says he trusts, has said as much. A President Biden couldn’t do everything to stop Covid-19. He couldn’t mandate a national stay-at-home order, and it would take a huge amount of political capital to get Republican governors on board with one. He couldn’t require masks nationwide, though he could urge states to issue their own. And he certainly can’t speed along the science that will, hopefully, eventually lead to a vaccine. That’s why Biden’s Covid-19 plan starts with improving US testing and tracing. That’s how the country gets through those intervening months. It’s the first step toward the end. Help keep Vox free for all Millions turn to Vox each month to understand what’s happening in the news, from the coronavirus crisis to a racial reckoning to what is, quite possibly, the most consequential presidential election of our lifetimes. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone make sense of an increasingly chaotic world: Contribute today from as little as $3.
vox.com
Want to fix American politics? Start by copying 'The Great British Baking Show'
On the eve of the 2020 presidential debates, the return of "The Great British Baking Show" provides a model for detoxifying our electoral process.
latimes.com
Jeff Okudah, Detroit Lions bounce back: 'I was tired of being disrespected by everyone'
Lions rookie Jeff Okudah wanted to make a statement after his team opened the season 0-2 to extend an 11-game losing streak.        
usatoday.com
Pregnant ‘Vanderpump Rules’ cast members pose for a baby bump photo
Babies on board.
nypost.com
What Trump’s taxes tell us about his foreign entanglements
President Donald Trump and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan leave the stage after the family photo to head to the plenary session at the NATO summit at the Grove hotel in Watford, northeast of London, on December 4, 2019. | Peter Nicholls/AFP via Getty Images Countries use Trump’s business to influence US foreign policy. The entanglements between President Donald Trump’s foreign policy and his global business have long been an unnerving feature of his White House tenure, giving rise to ethics concerns — as well as fears that allies and adversaries might use those businesses to manipulate the executive branch. The New York Times’s landmark report on Trump’s taxes over the past two decades helped expose the nature of some of those ties abroad — and they’re more extensive than the president has let on. According to the revelations, Trump — who broke with decades of precedent by refusing to publicly release his tax returns — brought in $73 million from around the world during his first two years in office. A lot of those funds came from his golf resorts in Scotland and Ireland. But he also received cash from countries crucial to the global affairs objectives of his administration, like $3 million from the Philippines, $2.3 million from India, and another $1 million from Turkey. The returns also show that Trump’s empire garnered more revenue from abroad than previously known. Over the past two decades, for example, Trump earned at least $13 million in a licensing deal for two towers in Turkey; a similar agreement in the Philippine capital of Manila was worth $9.3 million; and he made $5 million in a botched hotel project in Azerbaijan, roughly twice what he revealed in an ethics filing. Furthermore, Trump in 2017 paid hundreds of thousands of dollars more in taxes to foreign countries like Panama, India, and the Philippines than he did the US, where he paid the lowly sum of $750. Trump has made a lot of money from foreign sources since becoming president None of the president’s foreign earnings are terribly surprising, as Trump’s hundreds of businesses have continued with their work as usual since he became America’s president. In 2017, the Washington Post detailed how Trump made millions licensing his name to real estate projects around the world. Congressional committees revealed foreign governments booked rooms at Trump’s hotel in Washington ahead of official meetings. And Open Secrets, a group researching the influence of money in politics, reported in 2019 that Trump held $130 million in foreign assets by the end of his second year in office. His most recent personal financial disclosures, covering 2016 through 2019, showed revenues of up to $4.1 million came from India, up to $7 million came from Turkey, and up to $5 million came from the Philippines, per the researchers. “Trump is continuing to profit from his foreign business interests,” Open Secrets’ Anna Massoglia told me, adding that the Times report has helped illuminate how he’s doing so, “as well as on other financial entanglements that he’s paying taxes on.” However, Massoglia noted, “there are a lot of gaps because he hasn’t disclosed his tax returns.” Those personal tax returns would provide an even more detailed picture than the documents the Times collected. The Times’s tax return story, though, still drives home that Trump has made — and is still making — more money from other countries than he’s admitted publicly. That’s troubling, especially since it could negatively interfere with his job as president and remit as the unquestioned authority of US foreign policy. As Mieke Eoyang, a former staffer on the Senate Intelligence Committee and now senior vice president of the Third Way think tank in Washington, tweeted after the story broke, “Our national security officials must act in the country’s interest not that of their foreign creditors.” Why the tax return story is so worrisome for US foreign policy Trump has back-slapped the authoritarian leaders of the three main countries cited by the Times’s report: the Philippines, India, and Turkey. It’s less clear now if the bonhomie stems from their diplomatic relationships or because they lead nations that are lucrative for the president. Turkey is perhaps the best example of this conundrum. Trump said last year that he was a “big fan of” President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, but their relationship hit some snags over Ankara’s attacks on US allies in Syria and its unlawful imprisonment of an American pastor. When US-Turkey ties were low, the Times recalled a few curiosities: [In 2018,] a Turkish business group canceled a conference at Mr. Trump’s Washington hotel; six months later, when the two countries were on better terms, the rescheduled event was attended by Turkish government officials. Turkish Airlines also chose the Trump National Golf Club in suburban Virginia to host an event [in 2017]. In other words, countries like Turkey can potentially find ways to Trump’s heart by ensuring money goes into his family’s pocket in hopes of altering US foreign policy. The Trump Organization, then, gives nations an unprecedented extra leverage point to influence an American president. Money flowing into Trump’s pockets perhaps answers the question Trump himself asked of journalist Bob Woodward during an interview for the book Rage. “It’s funny, the relationships I have, the tougher and meaner they are, the better I get along with them,” Trump told Woodward about his relationships with authoritarian leaders, including Erdoğan. “Explain that to me someday, okay?” Perhaps also smoothing the way, as the New York Times notes, other nations have placed former Trump associates into positions of power. For instance, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte made the businessman behind the Trump Tower in Manila a special trade envoy to the US, and Argentina’s government named someone instrumental in Trump’s licensing deal in Uruguay to a cabinet post. The implication of such moves is some foreign governments altered their operations and staffing just to appeal to the president (as the saying goes: personnel is policy). And these decisions make clear Trump’s businesses aren’t just a side nuisance and ethical dilemma — they are central to how parts of the world interact with the US during this administration. All of this is a problem. Yes, foreign governments funneling money into business linked with the president goes against federal law. But since such rule-breaking hasn’t — and likely won’t — lead to immediate action, the biggest concern is this: If the president makes decisions based on his private interests, and not the public’s, then he’s subjugating the demands of US foreign policy for the bottom line of his family’s business. That issue becomes more acute when you factor in Trump’s $421 million in debt, much of it owed in the next four years. It’s unclear exactly who he owes that money to, but it’s not unreasonable given the scope of the Trump Organization’s foreign business to assume some of the debt is held by foreign lenders like Deutsche Bank, which has loaned Trump’s businesses several hundred million dollars in recent years. These debts could mean Trump has financial concerns on his mind during officials chats with his counterparts. "We don't know where Donald Trump has borrowed that money from," says Andrew McCabe. "If that money is from foreign sources then it really opens a Pandora's box about foreign influence issues with the President of the US. It does not get any more serious than that."— Kylie Atwood (@kylieatwood) September 28, 2020 Ensuring foreign powers don’t have financial leverage over government officials is why, as Eoyang pointed out on Twitter, “Debt is one of the factors that goes into the denial of a security clearance. Foreign Indebtedness is a red flag.” Due to the New York Times, that red flag — among others — is waving wildly. Help keep Vox free for all Millions turn to Vox each month to understand what’s happening in the news, from the coronavirus crisis to a racial reckoning to what is, quite possibly, the most consequential presidential election of our lifetimes. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone make sense of an increasingly chaotic world: Contribute today from as little as $3.
vox.com
Conference USA power rankings: UTEP, UTSA jump in the rankings while Southern Miss falls
Several teams picked up huge wins last week while MTSU and Southern Miss continue to search for their first wins.        
usatoday.com
Heavy rainfall could drench the D.C. area Tuesday and Wednesday
Timing is key, with the speed of the approaching cold front integral in determining rainfall amounts.
washingtonpost.com
Steelers' Alejandro Villanueva reveals why he honors Army Sgt. 1st Class Alwyn Cashe on helmet
Pittsburgh Steelers offensive lineman Alejandro Villanueva said Monday his decision to wear Sgt. 1st Class Alwyn Cashe’s name on the back of his helmet over Antwon Rose Jr.’s name was “exclusively” about getting him a Medal of Honor.
foxnews.com
Airline furloughs loom for thousands of workers
A CNN analysis finds nearly 50,000 airline workers are facing furloughs that begin Oct. 1. CNN's Pete Muntean reports.
edition.cnn.com
Hakeem Dawodu wants to figure out how to 'catch all these guys running from me'
Hakeem Dawodu wants to figure out how to 'catch all these guys running from me'        Related StoriesJake Matthews wanted to say sorry to Diego Sanchez while punching him in the faceUFC on ESPN 16: Make your predictions for Holly Holm vs. Irene AldanaMatchup Roundup: New UFC and Bellator fights announced in the past week (Sept. 21-27) 
usatoday.com
A Rare Expansion in Abortion Access Because of COVID-19
When the FDA approved mifepristone in late September 2000, advocates believed it was going to change abortion care in this country. Mifepristone causes an abortion when used with another long-approved drug, misoprostol. (In the United States, this regimen is used through ten or eleven weeks of pregnancy.) “Medication abortion,” as this new modality was called,…
time.com
Christian group raises over $500K for Kenosha shooter Kyle Rittenhouse
A Christian crowdfunding site has raised more than $520,000 to help cover legal fees for Kenosha shooter Kyle Rittenhouse.
nypost.com
Coronavirus viral loads declining in US patients since start of pandemic, study finds
By week 5 of the study, 70% of patients with coronavirus were categorized as initial low viral load.
foxnews.com
McMaster: Trump Taliban strategy a 'disaster'
Former National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster discusses pressing foreign policy issues and his new book "Battlegrounds".
edition.cnn.com
Psychic wearing Kyle Richards’ ‘stolen’ ring to appear on ‘Inside Edition’ Monday
The woman is reportedly demanding an apology.
nypost.com
'$750': Hollywood reacts in disgust to Trump's tax returns
Gabrielle Union, Kumail Nanjiani, Jim Carrey, George Takei, Billy Eichner, Ava DuVernay and others respond to Trump's years of income tax avoidance.
latimes.com
Judas Priest frontman Rob Halford details threesomes in new memoir
Halford said Camp Pendleton was like "Aladdin’s Cave" in the 1990s.
nypost.com
Google Accused of Not Fixing 'Illegal Advantage' Competition Problems
"Google is still in the mood that Microsoft once was, they think [they are] above the law," lawyer Thomas Höppner tells Newsweek.
newsweek.com
Opinion: From Carson Wentz to Sam Darnold, breaking down which NFL QBs' struggles are cause for concern
Some big-name quarterbacks have looked shaky through the first three weeks of the NFL season. Which ones are really in trouble?       
usatoday.com
Cadaver dogs to search Carole Baskin's missing husband Don Lewis’ lake house, ex-detective says
Jim Rathmann, a retired homicide investigator, is featured on Investigation Discovery's special “Joe Exotic: Tigers, Lies and Cover-Up."
foxnews.com
Kentucky lawmaker plans to introduce legislation to redefine 'rioting'
A Kentucky state lawmaker is planning to introduce legislation to refine "rioting" following the arrest of one of her colleagues last week amid several days of protests over the lack of criminal charges against police officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor. 
foxnews.com
Eagles Doug Pederson regrets OT punt, believes Carson Wentz could've made game winning play
Doug Pederson may be the only one in Philadelphia standing in Carson Wentz’s corner after the Eagles tied with the Cincinnati Bengals on Sunday. 
foxnews.com
Score a 10-pack of FDA-certified KN95 face masks for $25
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people wear face coverings while in public settings to help prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. A mask acts as a protective barrier between your respiratory droplets (caused by coughing, sneezing, talking, or raising your voice) and other people. Depending on...
nypost.com
Pelosi urges colleagues to prepare for 2020 presidential election reaching Congress
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., urged her congressional colleagues to redirect their fundraising efforts in an attempt to shore up the type of majority the party would need if the 2020 presidential election reached her chamber.
foxnews.com
10 celebrities that proved that you can be successful in music and in film
Vin Diesel finally released his debut single last week and the internet will never be the same. But he isn't the only celebrity who has seen success on-screen and on the charts.
edition.cnn.com
Trump's taxes tell a tale of debt and desperation
Ed McCaffery writes that the details of the new Times report paint a picture of a man using fairly standard tools of tax planning for the wealthy, but to lavish extremes.
edition.cnn.com
Opinion: Trump's taxes tell a tale of debt and desperation
The New York Times has broken a major story, based on access to decades of President Donald Trump's tax return data, just as they have in the past broken stories about the President's father, Fred Trump, and his aggressive tax planning, Donald Trump's billion-dollar tax losses in the late 80s and early 90s, and son-in-law Jared Kushner's years of apparent multimillion dollar federal tax avoidance. (A spokesman for Kushner's attorney has said that "Mr. Kushner properly filed and paid all taxes due under the law and regulations.")
edition.cnn.com
Here's how to get 4 months of Amazon Music Unlimited for just $1
Amazon Prime Day 2020 deals have already begun—Find out how to get four months of Amazon Music unlimited for just $1.       
usatoday.com
Amazon takes up to 35 percent off Cole Haan shoes for early Prime Day deal
Amazon’s annual Prime Day definitely doesn’t disappoint, with the two-day event officially being announced to run October 13 and October 14. During Prime Day, you’re sure to find markdowns on a variety of home, lifestyle and fashion goods. And if you’re looking for some statement kicks, then you’ll love its early Cole Haan deals. Known...
nypost.com
Chadwick Boseman took pay cut to boost co-star Sienna Miller’s salary
“That kind of thing just doesn't happen," Miller said.
nypost.com
Body cam footage shows Trump campaign aide Brad Parscale being tackled, detained by police
The video shows police tackle Parscale to the ground and place handcuffs on him.
foxnews.com
Wildfires erupt in northern California wine country
California firefighters battled destructive new wildfires in wine country north of San Francisco Monday as strong winds fanned flames in the already badly scorched state. (Sept. 28)       
usatoday.com
Eagles can’t ignore their Carson Wentz problem much longer
Week 3 of the NFL season was a wild one. We saw upsets, wild comebacks, even a near-walk off hook and ladder in the Chargers-Panthers game. It also gave us a fuller picture of what the NFL will look like. Six 3-0 teams remain – the Bills, Steelers, Packers, Seahawks, Bears and Titans – and...
nypost.com
Column: Humbug! A curmudgeon's view of Tuesday's presidential debate
The most likely scenario for the Trump-Biden debate is that these two septuagenarian men will simply confirm what everybody already thinks about them.
latimes.com
Drone flies human kidney 10 miles across Las Vegas desert
Special delivery! A drone flew a human kidney for more than 10 miles across the Las Vegas desert, marking the longest organ delivery flight via unmanned aircraft in the world, officials said. The historic flight happened on Sept. 17 and was one of two successful test drone runs carrying a human organ and tissue in...
nypost.com
The best sales to shop today: Amazon, Adidas, Perry Ellis and more
Today, you'll find deals on Amazon services ahead of Prime Day, discounts on Adidas and savings on plenty of clothes from Nordstrom Rack, Perry Ellis and Vineyard Vines. All that and more, below.
edition.cnn.com
The danger for Trump: Erosion among independents and those with college degrees
A review of Post-ABC polling in 2016 and 2020 shows where things have gotten worse for Trump.
washingtonpost.com
AT&T launches new mix-and-match unlimited family plans
The wireless company said Monday customers will have the flexibility to pick the Unlimited wireless plan that best fits each person in the family.       
usatoday.com
Police are looking for the suspect in a homicide at a popular haunted house
Detroit police are asking for the public's help in identifying a potential suspect in a homicide that occurred outside a popular haunted house.
edition.cnn.com
Earn 15 accredited certifications with this project management training
Whether you want to pivot industries, kickstart your career, or grow within your current organization, having a firm grasp of essential management tools is a great way to get your resume noticed. If this sounds like you, then you need to check out The Ultimate Six Sigma, Lean & Quality Management Bootcamp, which includes 18 courses...
nypost.com
Pennsylvania GOP lawmakers ask Supreme Court to stop voting accommodations
The state’s high court agreed with Democrats on leeway for counting mail-in ballots.
washingtonpost.com
Chiefs vs. Ravens line, prediction: Why Under is the smart bet
We get the matchup most think we will see again in the AFC Championship game when the 2-0 Kansas City Chiefs pay a visit to the 2-0 Baltimore Ravens on “ Monday Night Football.” These are the top two favorites to represent the AFC in Super Bowl LV. We also have a matchup of the...
nypost.com
Jake Matthews wanted to say sorry to Diego Sanchez while punching him in the face
Jake Matthews wanted to say sorry to Diego Sanchez while punching him in the face        Related StoriesUFC on ESPN 16: Make your predictions for Holly Holm vs. Irene AldanaMatchup Roundup: New UFC and Bellator fights announced in the past week (Sept. 21-27)Danilo Marques' takedown game led to win in long-awaited return to action at UFC 253 
usatoday.com
Wide open spaces, no cases: This Oregon county has dodged COVID-19 completely
Wheeler County, located in north-central Oregon with rugged rim-rocked hills and canyons, is one of only six nationwide without a COVID-19 case.        
usatoday.com
Dan Brown’s publisher thrilled by ‘boring’ author’s cheating scandal
Bestselling author Dan Brown says his publisher was thrilled that he cheated on his wife — because readers thought he was too boring. “I called my publisher and said, ‘I’m so sorry, I hope this doesn’t impact sales,'” the “Da Vinci Code” author wrote in the Sunday Times of London about his ex-wife accusing him...
nypost.com
Man builds candy-shooting cannon, robot to keep trick-or-treating alive
This isn’t your father’s trick-or-treating. As the holiday draws closer, people across the country are still asking what Halloween will look like this year. Some areas have discussed canceling events like trick-or-treating, while it appears that others are looking to invent new ways to keep the tradition alive. Luke Keyes still plans on giving out...
nypost.com
Trump denies New York Times report on his taxes ahead of first presidential debate
President Trump is on the defensive after a New York Times article revealed information about his tax records that he has spent years concealing. The Times report comes ahead of the first presidential debate between Mr. Trump and Joe Biden. CBS News White House correspondent Paula Reid reports on what the newspaper found, and CBSN political reporter Caitlin Huey-Burns joined CBSN from Cleveland to discuss the upcoming debate.
cbsnews.com