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Ceremony for Ruth Bader Ginsburg lying in state at U.S. Capitol
The late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg became the first woman in history to lie in state at the U.S. Capitol, following her death last week at age 87. CBSN anchors Vladimir Duthiers and Anne-Marie Green anchored live coverage as a ceremony was held to honor Ginsburg in Statuary Hall of the Capitol.
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Trump continues refusing to commit to a peaceful transition if he loses reelection
President Trump is again refusing to commit to a peaceful transition of power if he loses the 2020 election. This comes as FBI Director Christopher Wray, who was appointed by the president, reiterates the agency is not finding evidence of nationwide voter fraud. CBS News White House correspondent Ben Tracy joined CBSN to discuss the latest.
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380 secret detention camps reportedly found in China
More of the facilities resemble prisons, an Australian think tank says.
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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on what's next in Supreme Court fight, fate of the Affordable Care Act
As President Trump gets set to nominate his pick for the Supreme Court, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi joins "CBS This Morning" to weigh in on the confirmation fight, and what a conservative court could mean for the Affordable Care Act.
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Will COVID-19 kill the holiday shopping season?
With economy still fragile, many Americans are expected to keep a lid on spending this year.
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Man asks people to "Honk 4 Hope" as he bikes across U.S., raising awareness for suicide prevention
28-year-old Patrick Diederich is cycling from his home in New York all the way to San Francisco this month, and he's wearing a sign on his back asking people to honk at him – for a good reason.
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Homeownership increasingly becoming out of reach for many American families
Homeownership is increasingly becoming out of reach for many American families. Tony Dokoupil reports on how a shortage of available homes is fueling the problem.
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White House chief of staff Mark Meadows on accepting election results
White House chief of staff Mark Meadows joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss President Trump's refusal to say if he will accept the results of the election and commit to a peaceful transfer of power.
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President Trump again suggests he might not accept election results
At a rally in Florida on Thursday, President Trump again suggested he might not accept the outcome of November's election if he loses. In a direct rebuke of the president, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed a resolution reaffirming its commitment to a peaceful transfer of power. Ben Tracy reports.
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Judge tosses suit, calling Tucker Carlson's comments "opinion"
Judge rules that Karen McDougal failed to prove Tucker Carlson was accusing her of an actual crime by calling her payout "extortion."
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South Korea says Kim apologized for official's "unfortunate" killing
The North Korean dictator has purportedly told South Korea he's "very sorry" about the incident at sea. It would be an unprecedented apology.
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Should statues of Christopher Columbus come down?
Dozens of Christopher Columbus statues have come down across the United States in recent months as America reckons with its past. We take a look at the complicated legacy of Columbus and whether he merits a monument.
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Demonstrators take to the streets for the second night to protest Breonna Taylor grand jury decision
Demonstrators took to the streets for a second night in Louisville to protest a Kentucky grand jury's decision not to indict any officers in the fatal police shooting of Breonna Taylor. Watch CBS affiliate WLKY's coverage here.
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Protests erupt nationwide over Breonna Taylor case
Protests erupted nationwide Wednesday after no officers were directly charged in the death of Breanna Taylor. Jericka Duncan is in Louisville, Kentucky, where two officers were shot during the first night of demonstrations. She joined CBSN with more from the scene.
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US executes first Black man since federal executions resumed
Christopher Vialva was executed for a double murder he committed at 19.
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Trump declines to commit to peaceful transfer of power
With 40 days to go until polls close, President Trump is refusing to commit to a peaceful transition of power if he loses the upcoming election. CBSN political reporter Caitlin Huey-Burns, CBS News political correspondent Ed O'Keefe, and Axios White House reporter Alayna Treene spoke to "Red and Blue" anchor Elaine Quijano about what the president does and doesn't have the power to do if he contests the election results.
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ViacomCBS says probe didn't support claim against CEO Bob Bakish
The company's board said an independent review did not support the allegation, but stressed that it "takes any allegation of this type seriously."
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Pac-12 football will resume November 6
University presidents voted unanimously to lift a January 1 moratorium on athletic competition.
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Current state of technology and social media in the U.S.
Facebook announced the removal of hundreds of Russian-linked accounts, pages and groups. The Justice Department is trying to force big tech to take responsibility for content on their platforms, while the U.S. government and TikTok remain at odds. Top app makers are rallying against Apple & Google app stores, and Apple is touting new COVID-19 features across all devices. CNET senior producer Dan Patterson joined CBSN's Lana Zak to discuss all things tech in the U.S.
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Federal court rejects Trump campaign's effort to stop Nevada's mail ballot plan
Nevada Attorney General Aaron Ford joined "Red and Blue" to discuss a federal judge's decision to reject the Trump campaign's attempt to stop Nevada's new mail ballot law.
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9/24/20: Red and Blue
The countdown to Election day, 2020; How the news media covers Trump's Presidency
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How should the media cover the presidential race in the Trump era?
A recent article in The Atlantic calls upon the media to change its coverage of this year's presidential race. James Fallows, a staff writer with The Atlantic, joined CBSN's Elaine Quijano to discuss.
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Formerly incarcerated people face financial obstacles to voting
The ACLU says roughly 5.8 million people in the U.S. can't vote this year because of a patchwork of state felony disenfranchisement laws. CBSN political reporter Caitlin Huey-Burns spoke to "Red and Blue" host Elaine Quijano about some of the barriers to voting they are facing.
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Fears of uncounted votes after Pennsylvania "naked ballot" ruling
There's fear about mail-in voting in Pennsylvania, a crucial swing state. If voters don't follow the instructions precisely, many ballots could be thrown out. Major Garrett has more on our series, "America Decides 2020: Counting Your Vote."
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12 witnesses say cops didn't ID themselves in Breonna Taylor raid, attorneys say
Attorneys for the Taylor family and for Kenneth Walker are calling on the Kentucky AG to release the grand jury report.
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Millions without unemployment benefits amid economic fallout
Over 11 million Americans have yet to receive any unemployment benefits after losing their job from the coronavirus pandemic. Mark Strassmann reports.
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Tesla accuses electric truck maker Nikola of stealing design
Nikola's shares have plunged recently, as company endures what one analyst calls a "Twilight Zone of a few weeks."
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Breonna Taylor case raises questions over use of force standards
The lack of charges in the death of 26-year-old Breonna Taylor is sparking concerns over the use of force by police. Adriana Diaz has the latest.
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